Camino Finisterre & Camino Muxía – complete guide

Sanctuary of A Nosa Señora da Barca, Muxía
Sanctuary of A Nosa Señora da Barca, Muxía. Camino de Santiago Finisterre-Muxía

Camino Finisterre (or Fisterra in Galician) is an extension of the Camino de Santiago that takes pilgrims from Santiago de Compostela to what in old times was believed to be “the end of the world” or Finisterre. The Finisterre-Muxia route is the only way that starts not ends in Santiago. There are two finishing points on this route Finisterre and Muxía, you can choose one of them or walk to both, there is a route (part of the Camino) that connects them. First 60km from Santiago it’s the same route, at Hospital it splits into two different ways (day 3).

Distance from Santiago

  • Santiago to Finisterre – 89km/55 miles
  • Santiago to Muxía – 86km/53 miles
  • Santiago to Muxía to Finisterre – 115km/71 miles
  • Santiago to Finisterre to Muxía – 118km/73 miles

Finisterre vs Muxía – choose one vs visit both

It’s always difficult to compare places and sights and say which one is better. If you have enough time we’d suggest to visit both, if you have to choose go to Finisterre, not because it’s better or more beautiful just because historically it was the end of the route. As for us we liked Muxía more mostly because of the weather; we had a terrible day at Finisterre with stormy wind and pouring rain and a nice sunny day in Muxía.

Both points; Finisterre and Muxía have 0km marking whichever you go to first you’ll end at the 0km point.

More people go to Finisterre including day visitors and groups that arrive by bus; Muxía is less touristy even in peak season there are significantly less people.

The Cape in Muxía is only 10min. walk from the center of the town compared to 3km walk from the town to the point at Finisterre.

There are more places of interest in Muxía; sanctuary da Nossa Señora da Barca, A Ferida monument, Pidera de Abalar, Piedra dos Cadrís, Monte Corpiño view-point.

The actual cape in Muxía is more spacious compare to Finisterre people spread all over the area  – it doesn’t look overcrowded. 

Muxía town is quite picturesque; located on a small peninsula between the sea and the rocky hill, you can get a great view of it from the top of Monte (Mountain) Corpiño view-point. There are a couple of nice beaches around the town.

If you decide to walk to both points we’d suggest to go first to Muxía and from there to Finisterre; first, because there are more bus options to Santiago from Finisterre than from Muxía. Second, because if you have some time left you can go (walk or catch a bus) from Finisterre to Corcubión (14km) and from there take a taxi and visit beautiful Ezaro waterfalls, 20km from Corcubión.

There is a daily bus that goes between Finisterre and Muxía if you don’t feel like walking anymore you can always catch it. 

Camino de Santiago Finisterre-Muxia map
Route map of the Camino Finisterre-Muxia.

Need to know about the Camino Finisterre-Muxía

Most people walk this Camino after completing one of the longer Camino routes but it’s not compulsory you can do Finisterre as a separate walk.

The route is marked very well, there are plenty accommodation options on the way you definitely don’t need a company to plan the walk.

Delivery of a backpack can be arranged through several companies including Spanish post office (Correos), the price is between 4 and 6 Euro depending on the distance. As an option you can leave some of your stuff in Santiago (in your albergue or hostel) you won’t need much for a 4-5 day walk.

Being a part of the Camino de Santiago network the Finisterre route has municipal albergues that are exclusively for pilgrims. In order to stay there you have to show your Credential. The credential is a certificate that confirms that you’re a pilgrim. Every pilgrim needs one, at every albergue you stay (both municipal and private) your Credential gets stamped, some churches, restaurants and bars on the way have stamps as well.

Only people that walk, cycle or ride a horse (which we’ve never seen on any of the Caminos) are considered to be pilgrims. If you get to Finisterre by bus even if you just finished walking any other Camino you can’t stay in a municipal albergue.

Private albergues/hostels are for everybody regardless if you walked there or got by bus.

For completing the Camino Finisterre-Muxía (on foot, horseback or bicycle) you can get two certificates similar to the Compostela; the Finisterrana at the information office in Finisterre and the Muxiana in the municipal albergue in Muxía.

Finisterre, Km-0, Camino Muxia-Finisterre
Km-0 mark at Finisterre, Camino de Santiago

Best months for walking

We walked the Camino Finisterre in November and most of the time it rained sometimes very hard and the day we arrived at Finisterre was terrible; strong wind, heavy rain, bad visibility. From our Camino experience and locals’ advises shoulder season (April-June and September) is the best time; not too many people, weather is still nice (not too hot, not too rainy). In October you might be lucky and not get much rain or unlucky and walk all the way in pouring rain. Warmest months in Galicia are July and Augustthe busiest time when there are thousands of people everywhere. If you’re planning to walk in these months we’d suggest to book accommodation in advance. Low season November – March weather wise is not the best time for walking to Finisterre; it’s quite chilly, it rains a lot, very few pilgrims, many places are closed for off-season. 

Highlights of the Finisterre Way 

Ponte Maceira

A small picturesque village with an old medieval bridge (14th century) over the river Tambre, a waterfall, not very big but beautiful,  chapel of San Brais and a couple of old houses – a great place to stop for coffee or lunch to enjoy the scenery. 

Corcubión

A lovely town by the sea with a nice beach with cobblestone streets, the Gothic church of San Marcos, and a couple of street cafes. If you’re planning to stop before Finisterre we’d recommend to stay in Corcubión for a night.

Finisterre

The town of Finisterre is filled with hotels, albergues, restaurants, bars and souvenir shops, it is fine to stay here for one maybe two nights but it’s not the kind of place we’d like to stay longer. The Cape Finisterre is 3km away from the town, the walk is beautiful; along the coast with some stunning views especially if you’re luck with the weather.

Not to miss

  • Church Santa Maria de Areas on the way from the town to the lighthouse
  • Lighthouse of Finisterre
  • 0 km mark
  • The bronze sculpture of the boot
  • There is a tradition of burning an old piece of clothing or shoes at the boot sculpture. We didn’t do it (it was super windy and rainy) but if you decide to go for it make sure you don’t leave any traces and rubbish behind.
  • Another tradition is to go for a swim or a quick dip in the ocean, you can do it at one of the beaches on the way.

Accommodation in Finisterre

Budget | Albergue La Espiral | Pension Mirador Fin da Terra | there are a couple of albergues in Finisterre but they’re not in booking. There is a municipal albergue for 6 Euro but it can’t be booked beforehand.

Middle price range | Hotel Arenal | Hotel Bela Fisterra | Apartamentos O Almacen |

Luxury stay | Hotel O Semaforo (right at the point) | Spa Hotel Naturaleza Mar da Ardora |

Sunset at Finisterre, Camino Muxía-Finisterre
Sunset at Finisterre. It’s not our photo we had terrible weather that day and couldn’t take any photos at all.

Muxía

We liked Muxía more than Finisterre, in our opinion there are more things to do and to visit here. The town itself is more picturesque and nearby hills offer some great views over Muxía and the surrounding beaches.

Not to miss

  • Sanctuary of A Nosa Señora da Barca – it says that the ‘Our Lady’ appeared here to Saint Jacques, the shrine was built in 1719.
  • Sunset at the sanctuary
  • Piedra de Abalar – according to the tradition pilgrims go under the massive rock 9 times (facing the sea).
  • A Ferida (The Wound) – a rock sculpture that symbolizes a wound (damage) that was made to the ecosystem when 66 000 tons of oil were spilled after a huge tanker had broke close to the coast of Muxia in 2002.
  • o km sign
  • Mirador O Corpiño, at the top of the hill

Accommodation in Muxía

Budget option | Muxía Mare | Albergue @Muxía | Albergue Arribada | Albergue Bela Muxía | there is a municipal albergue for 6 Euro pp. it can’t be booked in advance.

Middle price range | Habitat Cm Muxía | A De Loló – Four Rooms | Casal Pedrajás | Bela Muxía |

Luxury stay | A Bughina | Pensíon Rustica Alemana |

Muxía from the view-point Monte Carpiño, Camino de Santiago
View on Muxía from Monte Corpiño view-point

Camino Finisterre cost

Accommodation – all municipal albergues on the route – 6 Euro, private albergues between 10 and 12 Euro (sometimes 14 Euro); pensions from 35 Euro for a double room.

Food – Menu del Dia (first dish, main, wine/beer/cool drink, coffee or dessert, bread) – 10 Euro; breakfast (coffee with croissant or toast with butter and jam) – 3 Euro; English breakfast with coffee – 5 Euro; dinner – 10-15 Euro, coffee between 1 and 1,5 Euro. A supermarket meal (ready-made salads, microwave meals, sandwiches) – between 2,5 and 4 Euro.

Transport – bus Finisterre – Santiago – 11 Euro; bus Muxía – Santiago – 8 Euro.

Laundry – 3 Euro washing, 3 Euro drying.

Our budget (2 people, 6 days)

Accommodation – 120 Euro, we stayed at both municipal and private albergues and one night in a pension. If you stay only in municipal albergues your accommodation will cost you as little as 24 Euro (4 days) and 30 Euro (5 days) per person.

Eating out – 45 Euro, we didn’t eat Menu del Dia, had breakfast a couple of times and stopped for coffee once a day.

Shopping – 100 Euro, most of our food we bought at supermarkets.

Laundry – 6 Euro, did washing+drying once.

Transport – 16 Euro, we took a bus from Muxía.

Total: 287 Euro/6 days/2 people or 24 Euro per person per day.

Church of San Xulian de Moraime, Camino Finisterre
Church of San Xulian de Moraime, Dumbría – Muxía stage of Camino Finisterre

Albergues on the Camino 

There are many albergues on the Camino almost every single town or village has one. Two types of albergues; municipal and private albergues. Municipal albergues are run by the municipality (state), cost 6 Euro per person per bed and are exclusively for pilgrims. Private albergues are more like hostels where anybody can stay, costs usually between 10 and 14 Euro pp.

On the Camino Muxía-Finisterre municipal albergues are in very good condition and often even better than private albergues (have fully equipped kitchen, heating, clean, big and spacious). We stayed at both municipal and private (or just went to check out some of them) and overall liked the municipal albergues more.

Municipal (public) albergues 

The municipal albergues open between 1pm and 1.30pm, the doors are closed after 10pm if you go out for dinner or drink make sure to come back in time. You have to leave municipal albergues before 8am next morning. You can stay in a municipal albergue only one night. All municipal albergues on the Camino Finisterre are opened all year around.

Albergue de peregrinos de Negreira. Capacity – 22 beds, price 6 Euro.

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, with microwave, cooking plates, fridge, pots, pans, plates, cutlery etc.
  • Wi-fi – yes, to connect you need a local (European) phone number
  • Washing machine – no, basins for hand washing
  • Drier – no
  • Blankets – yes, only few
  • Heating – yes, we stayed in November and it was hot inside
  • Extra – coffee and snack vending machine
  • Location – 4 out of 5, 30m away from the route but quite far from the town, shops, restaurants etc.
  • Comfort – 5 out of 5

Albergue de peregrinos de Olveiroa. Capacity – 46 beds, price 6 Euro.

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, with microwave, cooking plates, fridge, very few plates, cups, no cutlery.
  • Wi-fi – yes, to connect you need a local (European) phone number
  • Washing machine – no, basins for hand washing
  • Drier – no
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes
  • Location – 5 out of 5, 50m away from the route,close to the bars
  • Comfort – 4 out of 5, kitchen is not too great

Albergue de peregrinos de Dumbria (Albergue O Conco). Capacity – 26 beds, price 6 Euro. Our favorite municipal albergue on the Camino Muxia-Finisterre

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, with all you need for cooking; microwave, cooking plates, plates, pots, cups, cutlery.
  • Wi-fi – yes, to connect you need a local (European) phone number
  • Washing machine – no, basins for hand washing
  • Drier – no, there are washing lines
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes
  • Location – 4 out of 5, on the route about 10min. walk from the bar/shop
  • Comfort – 5 out of 5

Albergue de peregrinos de Muxía. Capacity – 32 beds, price 6 Euro. You can get your Muxiana (a certificate similar to Compostela that confirms that you’ve completed the Camino Muxia) at the albergue.

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, microwave, cooking plates, cups, pots, cutlery etc.
  • Wi-fi – yes, to connect you need a local (European) phone number
  • Washing machine – no, place for hand washing
  • Drier – no, washing lines
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes but it was off in November when we were there, it was very cold inside
  • Location – 5 out of 5, on the route to Finisterre, 5 min. walk to the supermarket and restaurants.
  • Extras – each bed has a locker (works with 1 Euro coin)
  • Comfort – 4 out of 5 if radiators were on would give it 5

Albergue de peregrinos de Finisterre. Capacity – 36 beds, price 6 Euro. The albergue is fine but if you finish the Camino in Finisterre it might be worth to stay in one of the private albergues or even treat yourself with a more comfortable staying at a hotel or guest house. There are many options in the town from 10 Euro on.

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, microwave, cooking plates, pots, plates, cutlery etc.
  • Wi-fi – yes, to connect you need a local (European) phone number
  • Washing machine – yes
  • Drier – yes
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes
  • Location – 5 out of 5, at the center, on the route, close to the supermarket, tourism office and restaurants.
  • Comfort – 4 out of 5, very few toilets and showers
Albergue de peregrinos de Dumbría, Camino Muxía
Albergue de peregrinos de Dumbría, Camino Muxía

Best private albergues on the route

We couldn’t stay at all the private albergues on this Camino; our choice is based on our personal experience combined with fellow pilgrims recommendations and impressions that we got from just visiting some albergues on the way.

Albergue Santiago km-0, Santiago de Compostela. It’s a great albergue to stay, amazing location 20m away from the Plaza de Obrodoiro, right on the Camino de Finisterre route, next to the Pilgrim’s Office, many restaurants and bars around, probably one of the best located accommodation in the city. It’s very cozy, comfortable, great staff, open 24 hours, some bottom bunk beds (in 10-bed dormitory) are double beds you can sleep like a king. Price between 16 to 21 Euro pp. depending on the room. Book here

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, with microwave, cooking plates, cup, cutlery etc.
  • Wi-fi – yes
  • Washing machine – yes
  • Drier – yes
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes
  • Extra – luggage storage (if you continue to Finisterre you can store here some extra stuff), lockers, personal light and power sockets. 
  • Location – 5 out of 5
  • Comfort – 5 out of 5
Albergue Santiago km-0, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Albergue Santiago km-0, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Photo; booking.com

Albergue Casa Vella, Vilaserío. This cozy albergue is located in a typical Galician house of 17th century in a small village of Vilaserío. Capacity 18 beds, opened all year. Price 12 Euro. Note! There are no shops in Vilaserío, only one or two bars.

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, with all you need for cooking
  • Wi-fi – yes
  • Washing machine – yes
  • Drier – yes
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes, a couple of fireplaces in the house
  • Extra – nice garden, can order breakfast and menu (including vegan menu)
  • Location – 5 out of 5
  • Comfort – 5 out of 5, very cozy place with great hosts

Albergue Monte Aro, Mazaricos (Lago)A lovely and comfortable place in a small village with a restaurant next door. Might be a good option to stop on the way from Negreira, 26km. Capacity 30 beds. Price 12-14 Euro pp. Book here

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, microwave, fridge, plates, cup, cutlery
  • Wi-fi – yes
  • Washing machine – yes
  • Drier – yes
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes
  • Extra – lockers, individual lights and sockets
  • Location – 5 out of 5
  • Comfort – 5 out of 5

Albergue La Espiral, FinisterreA nice place with very homey vibe and friendly hosts, located close to the supermarket, bus station and the route. Capacity 22 beds. Price 10-14 Euro pp., there are private rooms as well. Book here

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, with all you need for cooking including oil, spices etc.
  • Wi-fi – yes
  • Washing machine – yes
  • Drier – yes
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes, fireplace
  • Extra – breakfast, lunch and dinner for donation
  • Location – 5 out of 5
  • Comfort – 5 out of 5

Albergue Bela Muxia, MuxiaA big and modern albergue in the center of the town, close to the supermarkets and restaurants. Capacity 40 beds. Price between 12 and 17 Euro pp. Book here

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, with all you need for cooking
  • Wi-fi – yes
  • Washing machine – yes
  • Drier – yes
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes
  • Location – 5 out of 5
  • Comfort – 5 out of 5

Supermarkets on the route

Not many villages/towns on the way have a supermarket or at least a shop which makes it a bit difficult if you follow a special diet or a vegetarian for example. Remember! Supermarkets are closed on Sundays. You can find supermarkets in;

  • Negreira – a couple of big supermarkets, we’d recommend to stock up here – next supermarket (shop) you’ll get only on 3rd day of walking.
  • Olveiroa – a small shop with very few things.
  • Dumbría – a small grocery shop at the restaurant.
  • Cee – the biggest town in the area, many supermarkets, shops, bakeries etc.
  • Corcubión – one or two shops, it’s basically one town with Cee you always can walk there for shopping.
  • Finisterre – a couple of supermarkets and shops.
  • Muxia – a couple of supermarkets and shops.

Packing list for the Camino de Santiago

You can find the complete packing list for different seasons for men and women in this post ↓↓↓

Getting back to Santiago from Finisterre & Muxía

There are direct buses to Santiago from both towns. 6 or 4 daily buses from Finisterre, the journey takes between 2.15min. and 3 hours (depending on the route and stops). Bus leaves from the bus stop around the corner from the municipal albergue. Price 11 Euro pp. paid on the bus. Bus company Monbus check on the site for current times and prices. Note! In search box “Departure point” type “Fisterra”, the Galician name of the town.

From Muxía it takes between 1h35min. and 2 hours to get to Santiago, price 8 Euro, paid on the bus. Bus company  Grupo Ferrin. The bus leaves from Cafeteria Don Quijote, second stop at the bar O’Xardin. Note! There is a direct bus from Muxía to A Coruña in the morning as well.

Camino Finisterre-Muxía 4-day itinerary 

This itinerary is the most budget way of walking the Camino because you get to stay every night at a municipal albergue  for 6 Euro.

Day 1. Santiago de Compostela to Negreira, 21km/13 miles

The Camino starts at the Cathedral; from Obradoiro square follow Rua das Hortas, the street on the right that goes down past Hotel Reyes Catolicos. You’ll start seeing yellow arrows painted on the asphalt (though the arrows are a bit faded), follow the arrows. Cross Rua do Pombal (busy road) and follow along Rua da Poza de Bar. After about 1km from the cathedral, at Caballeria de San Lorenzo park, you’ll see the first distance pole. From there on the route is well marked with distance poles.

Camino Finisterre - stage 1 Santiago de Compostela - Negreira, altitude profile
Camino Finisterre altitude profile – stage 1 Santiago de Compostela – Negreira

Points of interest

  • Park Caballeria de San Lorenzo (here you find the first distance mark)
  • The medieval bridge over the River Roxos
  • The Baroque church of Trasmonte
  • A beautiful town of Ponte Maceira; a small waterfall, an old medieval bridge, the chapel of Carmen surrounded by picturesque green hills – a nice place to stop for coffee or lunch.
  • Pazo de Cotón – a medieval fort in Negreira (at the exit of the town, on the way to the municipal albergue).

Challenges

  • First 1km of the Camino through the city is not marked very well
  • Slight up and down hills all the way
  • A long and steep ascend after 12km, 220m altitude gain

Negreira

It’s quite a big town if you need to draw money, buy some medicine or stock food this is the place to do it. There will be no supermarkets or shops till Cee (if you go to Finisterre) or till Dumbria (if you go to Muxía).

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – yes, it’s about 1km past the town, we’d suggest to buy food on the way, there is a big Gadis supermarket on the way. To see facilities of the albergues go to Municipal albergues section.
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes
  • Shop – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes
Ponte Maceira village, Camino de Santiago Finisterre
A picturesque village of Ponte Maceira, Camino Finisterre-Muxía, stage 1; Santiago to Negreira

Day 2. Negreira to Olveiroa, 33km/20,5 miles

A nice walk through the forest in the beginning after a couple of hours it changes into the countryside scenery with many small villages, pasture fields, famous Galician rock granaries and hundreds of cows. The route continues going up and down all whe way. From Negreira on there are several bars-albergues finding a place to stop for coffee, breakfast or lunch won’t be a problem. We stopped for coffee at A Pena, about 8km from the municipal albergue. Note! There will be no shops/supermarkets on the way.

Camino Finisterre - stage 2 Negreira - Olveiroa, altitude profile
Camino Finisterre – stage 2 Negreira – Olveiroa, altitude profile

Points of interest

  • The granaries of As Maroñas
  • The old church in Santa Mariña
  • Church of San Cristovo de Corzón
  • Mount Aro (556m) from the top you can see a big part of the region and the sea
  • Ponte Olveiroa – a bridge built in 16th century

Challenges

  • A long but gradual ascend, 150m altitude gain that starts from the municipal albergue  
  • Some parts of the road might be a bit muddy if it rains a lot

Olveiroa

A small village with a couple of bars and albergues.

  • ATM – no
  • Municipal albergue – yes
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – yes, a very small grocery shop with few things
  • Pharmacy – no
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Day 3 (option 1). Olveiroa to Muxía, 32,5km/20 miles

Today you have to decide to go first to Muxía and then to Finisterre or other way around (if you’re planning to visit both of course). As I already mentioned before we’d recommend to go first to Muxía and finish in Finisterre, the walk is a little bit shorter 32km from Olveiroa to Muxia vs 35km to Finisterre.

A long walking day through the fields, forest, small villages with many hills on the way. After 5km from Olveiroa, at Hospital, the route splits into two; the right one goes to Muxia  the left continues to Finisterre. We walked both ways (we did the whole loop Hospital-Finisterre-Muxia-Dumbira) and I can say the scenery both ways is quite similar except on the way to Finisterre you walk past Corcubión – a nice beach town, from Corcubión to Finisterre you walk past several beaches. On the way to Muxía you can see the longest granary in Galicia, granary of San Mariño de Ozon.

Camino Finisterre - stage 3 Olveiroa - Muxia, altitude profile
Camino Finisterre – stage 3 Olveiroa – Muxia, altitude profile

Points of interest

  • Church of Santa Baia de Dumbría
  • Chapel de Santiño de Espiño
  • The granary of San Martiño de Ozón, the longest granary in Spain – 27m long.
  • Church of San Xulián de Moraime
  • Muxía

Challenges

  • An easy walking day, with slight up and down hills

Muxía

A nice little town where you can find all services, a good place for seafood lovers there are two restaurants that serve local seafood including famous pulpo (octopus). 

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – yes
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes, closed on Sundays
  • Shop – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes
The granary of Ozon, Camino Finisterre-Muxía
The granary of Ozon – longest granary in Galicia. Olveiro to Muxía stage, Camino Finisterre

Day 3 (option 2). Olveiroa to Finisterre, 35km/21,7 miles

After 5km at Hospital you’ll see a split, turn left to Finisterre. Note! The next place after the bar at Hospital (quite expensive) where you can get food or coffee is in Cee, 15km away. If you don’t feel like walking 35km all the way to Finisterre you can stop after 21km in Cee or Corcubión and the next morning continue to Finisterre, 14km more. If you’re not planning to continue to Muxía you can catch a bus back to Santiago de Compostela, there are 4 to 6 daily buses.

Camino Finisterre - stage 3 Olveiroa - Finisterre, altitude profile
Camino Finisterre – stage 3 Olveiroa – Finisterre, altitude profile

Points of interest

  • Sanctuary of A Nosa Señora das Neves and its “holy fountain” about 2km after Hospital
  • Chapel of San Pedro Mártir
  • O Cruceiro da Armada
  • Cee – the biggest town in the area with many restaurants, bars, bakeries etc. A beautiful church of A Xunqueira, several nice buildings.
  • Corcubión – a smallish town next to Cee with a nice beach, cobblestone streets, church of San Marcos.
  • The cove of Talón – a small beautiful beach
  • Long beach and sand dunes of Playa Langosteira
  • Finisterre

Challenges

  • Long distance – 35km
  • Relatively easy walk mostly flat with one long descend from Cruceiro da Armada to Cee.

Finisterra

A touristy town with many restaurants, bars, hotels, albergues and shops. 

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – yes
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes
  • Shop – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Day 4. Muxía to Finisterre/Finisterre to Muxía, 29km/18 miles

The route is marked both directions. The trail takes you through the beautiful forest, past some amazing beaches, green hills etc. The walk to Finisterre starts at the municipal albergue de Muxía and follows the coast for 2-3km and then turns inland. The only place on the way where you can find food (restaurants) is a small town of Lires, 15km from Muxía and 14km from Finisterre. There are a couple of hotels and guest houses in Lires if you have time and don’t feel like walking 29km in one day you can stay here. The actual Cape Finisterre is 3km away from the town, as an option you can check into albergue/guesthouse, leave there your backpack and walk last 3km (6km return) without extra weight.

If you have some time left you can walk or catch a bus from Finisterre to Corcubión, 14km away and from there take a taxi to the beautiful Ézaro waterfalls, about 10km away.

To get to the route from Finisterre first walk out of the town (the same way you came in) towards Playa Langosteira, at the road split turn left (don’t go down to the beach) and follow the street till you see Restaurante Asador on the left, in front of the restaurant there is a sign “Muxía”. After that the route is marked all the way to Muxía. The cape in Muxía with the sanctuary O Barca is just outside the town, 10 min. walk.

Camino Finisterre - stage 4 Muxia - Finisterre, altitude profile
Camino Finisterre – stage 4 Muxia – Finisterre, altitude profile

Points of interest

  • The beach of Lourido
  • Churches Santa Locaia de Frixe and Santa Maria de Morquintian in Lires
  • The beach of O Rostro

Challenges

  • One long ascend (if you walk from Muxía it’s steeper, coming from Finisterre side it’s very gradual), 200m altitude gain
  • Many smallish up and down hills
  • Only one place in the middle to stop for food

Download PDF file Camino Finisterre-Muxia 4 days.

O Rostro beach, walking from Muxía to Finisterre
Beautiful wild beach of O Rostro, on the way from Muxía to Finisterre

Camino Muxía in 4 days + 1 day Finisterre

If you have enough time and walking 30+km a day sounds too much you can walk the route from Santiago to Finisterre/Muxía in 4 days + 1 day to walk from Muxía to Finisterre or vice-verse, in total it will take 5 days to complete the route.

Day 1. Santiago to Negreira, 21km/13 miles

Same as 4-day itinerary.

Day 2. Negreira to As Maroñas/Santa Mariña, 22km/13,6 miles

As Maroñas and Santa Mariña are two small villages 1km apart. The private albergues in both villages are quite good though one in Santa Mariña doesn’t have a kitchen. As an option this day you can walk 6km further and stop at Lago, the private albergue there is nicer and the restaurant is better.

Points of interest

  • The granaries of As Maroñas
  • The old church in Santa Mariña

Challenges

  • A long gradual ascend, 150m altitude gain that starts from the municipal albergue de Negreira
  • Some parts of the road might be a bit muddy if it rains a lot

As Maroñas/Santa Mariña

Two villages 1km apart, each has an albergue and a bar, Santa Mariña has a bakery (closed on Sundays).

  • ATM – no
  • Municipal albergue – no
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – no
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – no, only a bakery
  • Pharmacy – no
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Day 3. As Maroñas/Santa Mariña to Dumbría, 22,5km/14 miles 

The bar at As Maroñas opens only at 9am if you’re planning to start walking earlier you can stop at Lago for breakfast, 6km, Monte Aro restaurant has different options including eggs and bacon.

Points of interest

  • Church of San Cristovo de Corzón
  • Mount Aro (556m) from the top you can see a big part of the region and the sea
  • Ponte Olveiroa – a bridge built in 16th century
  • Church of Santa Baia de Dumbría

Challenges

A moderate easy walking day with several up and down hills, nothing too hectic.

Dumbría

A bigger village than the previous two with some infrastructure.

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – yes
  • Private albergue – no
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – yes, grocery store at the bar
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Day 4. Dumbría to Muxía, 20,5km/12,7 miles

There will be a couple of places on the way to stop for breakfast, coffee or lunch, the first one in 5km.

Points of interest

  • Chapel de Santiño de Espiño
  • The granary of San Martiño de Ozón, the longest granary in Spain – 27m long.
  • Church of San Xulián de Moraime
  • Muxía

Challenges

  • An easy walking day, with slight up and down hills

Day 5. Muxía to Finisterre, 29km/18 miles

Same as 4-day itinerary

Download PDF file Camino Muxia 4 days.

Stunning view over the area from Monte Corpiño, Muxía
Stingy Nomads at the cape in Muxía

Camino Finisterre in 4 days + 1 day Muxía

Day 1. Santiago to Negreira, 21km/13 miles

Same as 4-day itinerary

Day 2. Negreira to Lago, 27km/16,7 miles

Points of interest

  • The granaries of As Maroñas
  • The old church in Santa Mariña
  • Church of San Cristovo de Corzón
  • Mount Aro (556m) from the top you can see a big part of the region and the sea

Challenges

  • A long but gradual ascend, 150m altitude gain that starts from the albergue  
  • Some parts of the path get muddy if it rains a lot

Lago

A tiny place not even a village with a nice private albergue, two restaurants and not much else.

  • ATM – no
  • Municipal albergue – no
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – no
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – no
  • Pharmacy – no
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Day 3. Lago to Cee/Corcubión, 27,5km/17 miles

The route splits 11km from Lago, at Hospital. Note! The bar at Hospital is the last food place, next one is only in Cee, 15km away.

Points of interest

  • Ponte Olveiroa – a bridge built in 16th century
  • Sanctuary of A Nosa Señora das Neves and its “holy fountain” about 2km after Hospital
  • Chapel of San Pedro Mártir
  • O Cruceiro da Armada
  • Cee – the biggest town in the area with many restaurants, bars, bakeries etc. A beautiful church of A Xunqueira, several nice buildings.
  • Corcubión – a smallish town next to Cee with a nice beach, cobblestone streets, church of San Marcos.

Challenges

  • Relatively easy walk mostly flat with one long descend from Cruceiro da Armada to Cee.

Cee/Corcubión

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – no
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes
  • Shop – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Day 4. Cee/Corcubión to Finisterre, 14,5km/9 miles

As an option after visiting the cape of Finisterre you can keep walking towards Muxía and stop at Lires which is 13km away. There are a couple of hostels and guest houses as well as restaurants and bars but no shops.

Points of interest

  • The cove of Talón – a small beautiful beach
  • Long beach and sand dunes of Playa Langosteira
  • Finisterre cape

Challenges

  • Easy and short walking day 

Day 5. Finisterre to Muxía, 29km/18 miles

Same as 4-day itinerary

Download PDF file Camino Finisterre 4 days.

Beautiful sunset in Muxía.
Beautiful sunset at the sanctuary of O Barca, Muxía.

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