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The Camino Finisterre – a 2023 guide & walking stages

The Camino Finisterre (or Fisterra in Galician) is an extension of the Camino de Santiago that takes pilgrims from Santiago de Compostela to what in old times was believed to be “the end of the world” or Finisterre. The Finisterre-Muxia route is the only way that starts not ends in Santiago de Compostela.

There are two finishing points on this route Finisterre and Muxía, you can choose one of them or walk to both, there is a route (part of the Camino) that connects them. The first 60km from Santiago it’s the same route, at Hospital it splits into two different ways (day 3). Most people walk this route after completing one of the longer Camino routes, we walked it after finishing the Camino del Norte.

The Lighthouse at Cape Muxia at the sunset
The beautiful sunset at Cape Muxia, the end of the Camino Finisterre-Muxia

Table of Contents

Camino Finisterre free downloadable PDFs

To help you with route planning we created downloadable PDF files that contain walking stages for the Camino Finisterre and places to stay along the route.

Camino Finisterre route overview

  • Distance – Santiago to Finisterre – 89km/55 miles, Santiago to Muxía – 86km/53 miles, Santiago to Muxía to Finisterre – 115km/71 miles, Santiago to Finisterre to Muxía – 118km/73 miles
  • Number of days required – 4-5
  • Starting point – Santiago de Compostela
  • Finishing point – Finisterre or Muxía
  • Average cost – 25-30 Euro per person per day
  • Route marking – yellow shells and arrows
  • Accommodation – public and private albergues, hostels, hotels
Our recap of the Camino Finisterre walk

If you don’t feel like walking more after completing one of the longer Camino routes you can stay in Santiago de Compostela for a couple of days there are many great things to do in the city including a day trip from Santiago to Finisterre and Muxia.

How long is the Camino Finisterre?

The route from Santiago de Compostela to Finisterre is 89 km/55 mi. The route from Santiago to Muxia is 86 km/53 mi. You need 3-5 days to complete it. If you walk to both capes the total distance is 115 km/71 mi. You’ll need 4-6 days to walk the Camino.

If you’re concerned about planning the Camino Finisterre by yourself you can book it through a company. They plan your itinerary, book your accommodation, and arrange luggage transfer for you all you have to do is walk.

Travel insurance for the Camino Finisterre-Muxia

You can read more information about travel insurance for the Camino de Santiago or get an instant quote for your trip right here.

World Nomads travel insurance has been designed by travelers for travelers, with coverage for more than 150 activities as well as emergency medical, lost luggage, trip cancellation and more.

Which is better Finisterre or Muxia?

It’s always difficult to compare places and sights and say which one is better. If you have enough time I’d suggest visiting both. If you have to choose, go to Cape Finisterre, not because it’s more beautiful but because historically it was the end of the Camino route. We liked Muxía more mostly because of the weather; we had a terrible day at Finisterre with stormy wind and pouring rain and a nice sunny day in Muxía.

  • Both points; Finisterre and Muxía have 0km marking whichever you go to you’ll end at the 0km point.
  • More people go to Finisterre including day visitors and groups that arrive by bus; Muxía is less touristy even in the peak season there are significantly fewer people.
  • The Cape in Muxía is only 10min. walk from the center of the town compared to a 3km walk from the town to the point at Finisterre.
  • There are more places of interest in Muxía; sanctuary da Nossa Señora da Barca, A Ferida monument, Piedra de Abalar, Piedra dos Cadrís, Monte Corpiño view-point.
  • The actual cape in Muxía is more spacious compared to Finisterre so it doesn’t get overcrowded. 

There is a daily bus that goes between Finisterre and Muxía if you don’t feel like walking. 

Camino Finisterre-Muxia books and guidebooks

Disclosure: Stingy Nomads take part in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program. When you buy something recommended in this post, we may get an affiliate commission — but it never affects your price or what we pick.

The main guidebook for the Camino Finisterre-Muxía is A Pilgrim’s Guide to the Camino Inglés: & Camino Finisterre Including Múxia Circuit (Camino Guides) by John Brierly, 2022 edition. This guide includes the Camino Ingles and the Camino Finisterre-Muxía routes.

If you like reading it might be worth joining the Amazon Kindle Unlimited program and getting free access to hundreds of thousands of Ebooks and audiobooks.

Can you get the Compostela for the Camino Finisterre?

Not, for completing the Camino Finisterre-Muxia you don’t get the Compostela certificate. You can get two similar certificates; the Finisterrana and the Muxiana. The Finisterrana you get at the Tourism Information in Finisterre. The Muxiana one you get in the municipal albergue in Muxía.

A milestone marking the end of the Camino Finisterre, 0 kilometre
A milestone at Cape Finisterre marking kilometer 0 of the Camino de Santiago

When is the best time for walking?

We walked the Camino Finisterre in November and most of the time it rained sometimes very hard the day we arrived at Finisterre was terrible; strong wind, heavy rain, and bad visibility. From our Camino experience, the shoulder season (May-June and September) is the best time to do the Camino; not too many people, and the weather is still nice (not too hot, not too rainy).

In October you might be lucky and not get much rain or unlucky and walk all the way in the pouring rain. The warmest months in Galicia are July and Augustthe busiest time when there are thousands of people everywhere. If you’re planning to walk in these months we’d suggest booking accommodation in advance. Low season November – March weather-wise is not the best time for walking to Finisterre; it’s quite chilly, it rains a lot, very few pilgrims, and many places are closed for the off-season. 

Camino Finisterre cost

Accommodation on the Camino. All municipal albergues on the route cost 8 Euro pp., private albergues are between 12 and 14 Euro, and hotels are 40+ Euro for a private room.

Food on the Camino de Santiago. Menu del Dia (first dish, main, wine/beer/cool drink, coffee or dessert, bread) – 10 Euro; breakfast (coffee with croissant or toast with butter and jam) – 3 Euro; English breakfast with coffee – 5 Euro; dinner – 10-15 Euro, coffee between 1 and 1,5 Euro. A supermarket meal (ready-made salads, microwave meals, sandwiches) – between 2,5 and 4 Euro.

Transport. Bus Finisterre – Santiago – 11 Euro; bus Muxía – Santiago – 8 Euro.

Laundry. 3 Euro washing, 3 Euro drying.

Our budget breakdown (2 people, 6 days)

  • Accommodation – 120 Euro, we stayed at both municipal and private albergues and one night in a pension. If you stay only in municipal albergues your accommodation will cost you as little as 24 Euro (4 days) and 30 Euro (5 days) per person.
  • Eating out – 45 Euro, we didn’t eat Menu del Dia, ate breakfast a couple of times, and stopped for coffee once a day.
  • Shopping – 100 Euro, most of the food we bought at supermarkets.
  • Laundry – 6 Euro, did washing+drying once.
  • Transport – 16 Euro, we took a bus from Muxía to Santiago de Compostela.

Total: 287 Euro/6 days/2 people or 24 Euro per person per day.

We have a detailed post on the cost of walking the Camino where you can find more information on expenses, money-saving tips, and find out what you can get on the Camino for 20, 30, and 40 Euro a day.

The Cape Finisterre lighthouse on the cliff surrounded by the sea
The lighthouse at Cape Finisterre, the end of the Camino Finisterre-Muxía

What is the accommodation like on the Camino?

Being a part of the Camino de Santiago routes the Finisterre route has albergues (special hostels for pilgrims). There are two types of albergues: municipal (public) and private albergues. Municipal albergues are exclusively for pilgrims. In order to stay there, you have to show your Credential, a certificate that confirms that you’re a pilgrim. You can get one for the Camino Finisterre at the Pilgrim’s Reception Office in Santiago.

Private albergues/hostels are for everybody regardless if you walked there or got by bus.

Municipal (public) albergues on the Camino Finisterre 

Municipal albergues are run by the municipality, they cost 8 Euro per person per bed. These albergues are exclusively for pilgrims with a Credential. The municipal albergues open for check-in between 1 pm and 1.30 pm.

The doors are usually closed after 10 pm if you go out for dinner or a drink make sure to come back in time. You have to leave municipal albergues before 8 am the next morning. You can stay in a municipal albergue for only one night.

On the Camino Finisterre municipal albergues are in very good condition (clean, big, and spacious). We stayed in both municipal and private and found the municipal albergues to be really good.

Public (municipal) albergues on the Camino Finisterre can be found in

  • Negreira – 21 km from Santiago
  • Olveiroa – 54 km from Santiago
  • Dumbria – 65 km from Santiago
  • Corcubión – 75 km from Santiago
  • Muxía – 86 km from Santiago
  • Finisterre – 89 km from Santiago

Private albergues on the route

Private albergues are more like hostels where anybody can stay. The cost is between 10 and 14 Euro pp. Private albergues are more flexible they might let you check in earlier and check out later. They’re usually smaller and have better facilities though, on the Camino Finisterre-Muxia, public albergues are really good.

Public vs private albergues on the Camino Finisterre

FeaturesPublic alberguesPrivate albergues
Price8 Euro12-14 Euro
Only for pilgrimsYesNo
Need the CredentialYesNo
Can be bookedNoYes
Accept luggage deliveryNoYes
Allow staying more than 1 nightNoYes
Comparing public and private albergues on the Camino Finisterre

What to pack for the walk?

This route is very short you don’t need to bring a lot of stuff. Many pilgrims leave their big backpacks in their hotel in Santiago and walk the Camino Finisterre with a day pack. As an option, you can use a backpack shuttle service and bring as much stuff as you want. You can find the complete packing list for different seasons for men and women in our Camino de Santiago packing list post.

Choosing the right pair of shoes and a good backpack is very important. Find out about the best shoes for walking the Camino and the best backpacks for the Camino de Santiago.

Campbell and Alya at the cape Muxia at the sunset
Stingy Nomads at Cape Muxia after completing the Camino Finisterre-Muxia in November

Backpack transfer on the Camino Finisterre

Like on any other Camino route, it’s possible to arrange luggage delivery service on the Camino Finisterre-Muxia. The delivery service is very simple in the morning you leave your backpack or suitcase at the reception on a private albergue of a hotel, a car picks it up and drives it to your next accommodation place. By the time you arrive, your luggage is already there. The average price is 7 Euro per backpack per stage.

There are several companies offering luggage delivery services on the Camino to Finisterre and to Muxía. The three main companies are Correos and Pilbeo.

Camino Finisterre-Muxia map

Camino Finisterre route map
A map of the Camino Finisterre-Muxia from Santiago

Santiago de Compostela, the beginning of the walk

The Camino Finisterre-Muxía is the only Camino route that starts and does not finish in Santiago. Most pilgrims walk it as an extension after completing one of the other routes. As I already mentioned we walked to Finisterre after finishing the Northern Camino. I can definitely recommend continuing to Finisterre if you have time especially after completing one of the long inland Camino routes e.g. the Camino Frances or the Via de la Plata. After walking for 30-40 days through the arid landscape and endless fields it’s really nice to get to the sea.

Tours and activities in Santiago de Compostela

Places to stay in Santiago

There are many great places to stay in Santiago de Compostela for different budgets from albergues to luxury hotels.

The Gothic Cathedral of St.James lightened by the sun
The Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, the starting point of the Camino Finisterre at the sunset

The Camino Finisterre-Muxía – our 4-day itinerary 

Day 1. Santiago de Compostela to Negreira, 21 km/13 mi

The Camino starts at the Cathedral; from Obradoiro square follow Rua das Hortas, the street on the right that goes down past Hotel Reyes Catolicos. You’ll start seeing yellow arrows painted on the asphalt (though the arrows are a bit faded), and follow the arrows. Cross Rua do Pombal (a busy road) and follow along Rua da Poza de Bar. After about 1km from the cathedral, at Caballeria de San Lorenzo Park, you’ll see the first distance pole. From there on the route is well-marked with distance poles.

If you want to split the stage into two you can stop at Roxos, a small village about 8 km from Santiago de Compostela. It’s not right on the Camino route, it’s about an 800-meter loop. There are two hotels Hotel O Desvio and Asador de Roxos Casa Albardonedo. This way you walk 21 km over 2 days; 8 km and 13 km (1 extra kilometer to get to Roxos from the Camino and back).

Points of interest

  • Park Caballeria de San Lorenzo (here you find the first distance mark)
  • The medieval bridge over the River Roxos
  • The Baroque church of Trasmonte
  • A beautiful town of Ponte Maceira; a small waterfall, an old medieval bridge, the chapel of Carmen surrounded by picturesque green hills – a nice place to stop for coffee or lunch.
  • Pazo de Cotón – a medieval fort in Negreira (at the exit of the town, on the way to the municipal albergue).

Challenges

  • The first 1km of the Camino through the city is not marked very well
  • Slight up and down hills all the way
  • A long and steep ascend after 12km, 220m altitude gain

Negreira

It’s quite a big town if you need to draw money, buy some medicine or stock food this is the place to do it. There will be no supermarkets or shops till Cee (if you go to Finisterre) or till Dumbría (if you go to Muxía).

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – yes, it’s about 1km past the town, we’d suggest bringing food, there is a big Gadis supermarket on the way.
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes
  • Shop – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

More places to stay in Negreira

A stone bridge at Ponte Maceira on the first day of the Camino walk
A picturesque village of Ponte Maceira, Camino Finisterre-Muxía

Day 2. Negreira to Olveiroa, 33 km/20,5 mi

A nice walk through the forest in the beginning after a couple of hours it changes into the countryside scenery with many small villages, pasture fields, famous Galician rock granaries and hundreds of cows. The route continues going up and down all the way. From Negreira on there are several bars-albergues finding a place to stop for coffee, breakfast or lunch won’t be a problem. We stopped for coffee at A Pena, about 8km from the municipal albergue. Note! There will be no shops/supermarkets on the way.

Points of interest

  • The granaries of As Maroñas
  • The old church in Santa Mariña
  • Church of San Cristovo de Corzón
  • Mount Aro (556m) from the top you can see a big part of the region and the sea
  • Ponte Olveiroa – a bridge built in the 16th century

Challenges

  • A long but gradual ascend, 150m altitude gain that starts from the municipal albergue  
  • Some parts of the road might be a bit muddy if it rains a lot

Olveiroa

A small village with a couple of bars and albergues.

  • ATM – no
  • Municipal albergue – yes
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – yes, a very small grocery shop with few things
  • Pharmacy – no
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

More places to stay in Olveiroa

Day 3 (option 1). Olveiroa to Muxía, 32,5 km/20 mi

Today you have to decide to go first to Muxía and then to Finisterre or another way around (if you’re planning to visit both of course). As I already mentioned above I’d recommend going first to Muxía and finishing in Finisterre. The walk from Olveiroa to Muxía is a little bit shorter – 32 km vs 35 km to Finisterre.

A long walking day through the fields, forest, and small villages with many hills on the way. After 5km from Olveiroa, at Hospital, the route splits into two; the right one goes to Muxia the left continues to Finisterre. We walked both ways (we did the whole loop Hospital-Finisterre-Muxia-Dumbira) and I can say the scenery both ways is quite similar except on the way to Finisterre you walk past Corcubión – a nice beach town, from Corcubión to Finisterre you walk past several beaches. On the way to Muxía, you can see the longest granary in Galicia, the granary of San Mariño de Ozon.

Points of interest

  • Church of Santa Baia de Dumbría
  • Chapel de Santiño de Espiño
  • The granary of San Martiño de Ozón, is the longest granary in Spain – 27m long.
  • Church of San Xulián de Moraime
  • Muxía

Challenges

  • An easy walking day, with slight up and down hills

Muxía

A nice little town where you can find all services, a good place for seafood lovers. There are two restaurants that serve local seafood including the famous pulpo (octopus). 

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – yes
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes, closed on Sundays
  • Shop – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Places to stay in Muxía

The granary of Ozon in Galicia on the walking route to Muxia
The granary of Ozon is the longest granary in Galicia. On the way from Olveiro to Muxía

Day 3 (option 2). Olveiroa to Finisterre, 32 km/20 mi

After 5km at Hospital, you’ll see a split, turn left to Finisterre. Note! The next place after the bar at Hospital (quite expensive) where you can get food or coffee is in Cee, 15km away. If you don’t feel like walking 32 km all the way to Finisterre you can stop after 21 km in Cee or Corcubión. The next morning you can continue walking to Finisterre, 11 km more.

The Cape Finisterre is about 3 km away from the town, it’s 6 km extra to walk to and back. You can check in, have lunch, leave your backpack at your place, and walk to Finisterre.

If you’re not planning to walk to Muxía you can catch a bus from Finisterre to Santiago de Compostela, there are 4 to 6 daily buses (depending on the day of the week).

Points of interest

  • Sanctuary of A Nosa Señora das Neves and its “holy fountain” about 2km after Hospital
  • Chapel of San Pedro Mártir
  • O Cruceiro da Armada
  • Cee – the biggest town in the area with many restaurants, bars, bakeries etc. A beautiful church of A Xunqueira, several nice buildings.
  • Corcubión – a smallish town next to Cee with a nice beach, cobblestone streets, church of San Marcos.
  • The cove of Talón – a small beautiful beach
  • The long beach and sand dunes of Playa Langosteira
  • Finisterre

Challenges

  • Distance – 35km
  • A relatively easy walk, mostly flat with one long descent from Cruceiro da Armada to Cee.

Finisterra

A touristy town with many restaurants, bars, hotels, albergues, and shops. 

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – yes
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes
  • Shop – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Places to stay in Finisterre

It’s possible to stay at the very cape Finisterre, next to the Lighthouse at Hotel O Semaforo. It’s quite pricey but the location and the scenery around are truly spectacular. It’s a small and cozy hotel with beautifully designed rooms, breathtaking views, and a nice restaurant.

Day 4. Muxía to Finisterre/Finisterre to Muxía, 29km/18 miles

The route is marked in both directions. The trail takes you through the beautiful forest, past some amazing beaches, green hills, etc. The walk to Finisterre starts at the municipal albergue de Muxía and follows the coast for 2-3 km and then turns inland. The only place on the way where you can find food (restaurants) is the small town of Lires, 15 km from Muxía and 14 km from Finisterre.

There are a couple of hotels and guest houses in Lires if you have time and don’t feel like walking 29 km in one day you can stay here. The actual Cape Finisterre is 3 km away from the town, as an option, you can check into albergue/guesthouse, leave there your backpack and walk the last 3 km (6km return) without extra weight.

If you have some time left you can walk or catch a bus from Finisterre to Corcubión, 14 km away, and from there take a taxi to the beautiful Ézaro waterfalls, about 10 km away.

To get to the route from Finisterre first walk out of the town (the same way you came in) towards Playa Langosteira, at the road split turn left (don’t go down to the beach), and follow the street till you see Restaurante Asador on the left, in front of the restaurant there is a sign “Muxía”. After that, the route is marked all the way to Muxía. The cape in Muxía with the sanctuary O Barca is just outside the town, 10 min. walk.

Points of interest

  • The beach of Lourido
  • Churches Santa Locaia de Frixe and Santa Maria de Morquintian in Lires
  • The beach of O Rostro

Challenges

  • One long ascend (if you walk from Muxía it’s steeper, coming from Finisterre side it’s very gradual), 200m altitude gain
  • Many smallish up and down hills
  • Only one place in the middle to stop for food
A view of the wild beach surrounded by the hills from the Camino route
A beautiful wild beach at O Rostro, on the way from Muxía to Finisterre

The Camino Finisterre – a 5-day itinerary

If you have enough time and walking 30+km a day sounds too much you can walk the route from Santiago to Finisterre/Muxía in 4 days + 1 day to walk from Muxía to Finisterre or vice-versa, in total it will take 5 days to complete the route.

Day 1. Santiago to Negreira, 21 km/13 miles

The first day of this itinerary is the same as day one of the 4-day itinerary.

Day 2. Negreira to As Maroñas, 22 km/13,6 mi or to Lago, 27 km/17 mi

If you’re walking to Finisterre first then it’s better to walk 27 km to Lago to make the next walking day to Corcubión shorter. If you’re going first to Muxía it’s better to stop at As Maroñas or Santa Mariña.

As Maroñas and Santa Mariña are two small villages 1km apart. The private albergues in both villages are quite good though one in Santa Mariña doesn’t have a kitchen. As an option this day you can walk 6km further and stop at Lago, the private albergue there is nicer and the restaurant is better.

Points of interest

  • The granaries of As Maroñas
  • The old church in Santa Mariña

Challenges

  • A long gradual ascend, 150m altitude gain that starts from the municipal albergue de Negreira
  • Some parts of the road might be a bit muddy if it rains a lot

As Maroñas/Santa Mariña

Two villages 1km apart, each has an albergue and a bar, Santa Mariña has a bakery (closed on Sundays).

  • ATM – no
  • Municipal albergue – no
  • Private albergue – yes, 2 private albergues in the village
  • Hotel – no
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – no, only a bakery
  • Pharmacy – no
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Lago (Mazaricos)

A tiny place not even a village with a nice private albergue, two restaurants and not much else.

  • ATM – no
  • Municipal albergue – no
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – no
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – no
  • Pharmacy – no
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Places to stay in Lago

Day 3 (option 1, Muxía). As Maroñas/Santa Mariña to Dumbría, 22,5 km/14 mi 

The bar at As Maroñas opens only at 9 am if you’re planning to start walking earlier you can stop at Lago for breakfast, 6km, Monte Aro restaurant has different options including eggs and bacon.

Points of interest

  • Church of San Cristovo de Corzón
  • Mount Aro (556m) from the top you can see a big part of the region and the sea
  • Ponte Olveiroa – a bridge built in the 16th century
  • Church of Santa Baia de Dumbría

Challenges

A moderate easy walking day with several up and down hills, nothing too hectic.

Dumbría

A bigger village than the previous two with some infrastructure.

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – yes
  • Private albergue – no
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – yes, a grocery store at the bar
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

More places to stay in Dumbría

A small Galician church on the way to Muxia
A small beautiful church on the route to Muxia

Day 3 (option 2, Finisterre). Lago to Cee/Corcubión, 27,5 km/17 mi

The route splits 11km from Lago, at Hospital. Note! The bar at Hospital is the last food place, the next one is only in Cee, 15km away.

Points of interest

  • Ponte Olveiroa – a bridge built in the 16th century
  • Sanctuary of A Nosa Señora das Neves and its “holy fountain” about 2km after Hospital
  • Chapel of San Pedro Mártir
  • O Cruzeiro da Armada
  • Cee – the biggest town in the area with many restaurants, bars, bakeries, etc. A beautiful church of A Xunqueira, several nice buildings.
  • Corcubión – a smallish town next to Cee with a nice beach, cobblestone streets, church of San Marcos.

Challenges

  • A relatively easy walk, mostly flat with one long descent from Cruceiro da Armada to Cee.

Cee/Corcubión

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – yes
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes
  • Shop – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Places to stay in Cee/Corcubión

Day 4 (option 1). Dumbría to Muxía, 20,5 km/12,7 mi

There will be a couple of places on the way to stop for breakfast, coffee or lunch, the first one in 5km.

Points of interest

  • Chapel de Santiño de Espiño
  • The granary of San Martiño de Ozón, is the longest granary in Spain – 27m long.
  • Church of San Xulián de Moraime
  • Muxía

Challenges

  • An easy walking day, with slight ups and downs

Places to stay in Muxía

There is a good public albergue in the town for 6 Euro for more information go to the 4-day itinerary.

Day 4 (option 2). Cee/Corcubión to Finisterre, 14,5 km/9 mi

As an option after visiting the Cape of Finisterre, you can keep walking towards Muxía and stop at Lires which is 13km away. There are a couple of hostels and guest houses as well as restaurants and bars but no shops.

Points of interest

  • The cove of Talón – a small beautiful beach
  • The long beach and sand dunes of Playa Langosteira
  • Finisterre cape

Challenges

  • An easy and short walking day 

Places to stay in Finisterre

There is a public albergue in the town for 8 Euro. For more details go to the 4-day itinerary.

Day 5. Muxía to Finisterre/Finisterre to Muxía, 29 km/18 mi

This day is the same as day four of the 4-day itinerary.

The town of Muxia and its harbor from the view-point at Monte Carpiño
The view of the town of Muxía from the lookout point Monte Carpiño

How to get back to Santiago de Compostela from Finisterre?

There are direct buses to Santiago from both towns. There are several daily buses from Finisterre, the journey takes between 2h15min. and 3 hours (depending on the route and stops). The bus leaves from the bus stop around the corner from the municipal albergue. Price 7 Euro pp. paid on the bus. You can check online for the current departure times and prices. Note! In the search box “Departure point” type “Fisterra”, the Galician name of the town.

How to get back from Muxía?

From Muxía it takes between 1h45min. and 2 hours to get to Santiago, the price is 7 Euro, paid on the bus. The bus leaves from Cafeteria Don Quijote, the second stop is at the bar O’Xardin. You can purchase tickets and check the up-to-date itinerary on the MonBus website.

Camino Finisterre-Muxía route planning resources

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Sarah

Tuesday 21st of November 2023

Hi guys! Your website helped me soooo much, planning my first camino in May this year! (I did the Camino Portugues from Porto to Santiago and I absoluters LOVED it!). Right now I’m planning to walk from Santiago to Fisterra and Muxia in May ‘24. Your PDF files and all the advice you give is so incredibly useful! Thank you so much for that!

Stingy Nomads

Friday 24th of November 2023

Hello Sarah. Thank you for the comment. We're sure you'll enjoy the Camino Finisterre. It's a beautiful route. Buen Camino

Catherine Grant

Friday 5th of August 2022

In September 2023 I am returning to complete the Portuguese Coastal Route. I am hoping to finish in Finisterre, if I can still walk, but should be OK after a days R&R in Santiago. , I'm intending to walk to Finisterre. I've just discovered this site, and its been so informative.I'm coming from NZ, and this time around I will be much better prepared.

Brendan Green

Saturday 4th of June 2022

You guys do fantastic guide books! Thank you. Brendan.

Marina

Monday 25th of April 2022

Hi Stingynomads, thank you very much for the guide. I just arrived in Negreira municipal albergue and have to add that the kitchen here is not equipped at all. It is empty. There is a microwave for sure and cooking plates, but besides that, nothing else. I found two plates, two glasses, one knife and bottle opener in the cupboards. That's it.

Jen H

Tuesday 13th of June 2023

I volunteered for two weeks in a municipal albergue this year (2023). I learned that because Galicia's municipal albergues do not have cooking implements like pots, pans, colanders, etc. This is because each albergue is staffed with only one person who cleans and sanitizes all buildings from 9am-11am, then handles check in from 1pm-10pm. Adding kitchen cleanup to their duties isn't sustainable due to these time limitations.

Kitchens often have a microwave for heat-eat meals. One enterprising pilgrim bought heavy-duty aluminum foil (to use as a baking sheet) and made five pizzas from scratch in the oven. If pilgrims want to cook in the municipal albergues, consider bringing a lightweight pot to use in the stove or order a la carte from a local restaurant. Hope this helps!

Stingy Nomads

Monday 25th of April 2022

Hello, Marina. Thank you for the comment. When we were there the albergue in Negreira definitely had more than you described. Maybe they'll get new utensils again. For the last two years, most albergues were closed there might be some lack of infrastructure or facilities. Buen Camino

Eleonora Priadi

Sunday 10th of April 2022

Hello Stingynomads,

Thank you very much for making this guide.

My friend and I are both female in mid sixty want to do the Camino Santiago- Muxia -Finnisterre at the end of May but we doubt that we can make the distances you suggested between stops. We are not used to long walk ( we try). Can we find accomodation between stops which you suggested? We are aiming to walk around 15km per day without luggage and allocate two and a a half weeks for the journey. Though personally I prefer municipal alberques because we will be among other pilgrims, on this journey we need a private room in any accomodation ( don't mind hotel/private alberque ) because of Covid as my friend is a cancer survivor so we have to be extra carefull.

I appreciate any information/tips from anyone from this forum.

Eleonora Priadi

Pam Banks

Monday 1st of August 2022

@Eleonora Priadi, Hi Eleonora, my friend and I would also like to do the Camino Santiago- Muxia -Finnisterre. We are both in our 60's and prefer to walk a shorter distance than some of the routes suggest, however, we also want to have our luggage transported between hotels. But to do that it seems we are restricted to one of the tours with their itinerary . How did you manage not to carry your luggage on the walk and would you mind sharing with us the route and hotels you used in May? Thank you so much Pam Banks

Eleonora Priadi

Wednesday 27th of April 2022

@Stingy Nomads,

Hi Stingynomads, Thank you again for the guide and I will continue to monitor the site for more information. With the help of your guide I have now made an itinerary with a distance between stops around 9- 14.5 km except for Santiago- Nigreira which is still 21km. I tried to check your map to find the name of the village or town between them to find the possibility of accomadation (Airbnb maybe?) but could not see anything even after using magnifying glass. Maybe you or anyone else who has done the route know. I appreciate the help because my friend and I are not sure we can walk the 21 km with the possibility of being lost thus will take longer.

We will have enough time because we allocated 19 days for the whole journey including flights from New York and London and we also plan to do the day tours from Santiago as you suggested as well.

I appareciate all youyr tips,

Eleonora

Stingy Nomads

Monday 11th of April 2022

Hello, Eleonora. Thank you for the comment. You can adjust the itinerary to your needs. At the beginning of this post (3rd paragraph), you can find two downloadable PDF files. One file contains walking stages for the Camino Finisterre (with distances between every town along the route), and the second file contains a list of places to stay along the route. Two and a half weeks only for walking the Camino or in total for the trip including getting to and back? Even if you walk only 10 km a day you will be able to complete the route in 10 days. There are private accommodation options on the Camino Finisterre it's understandable that you and your friend rather stay in private. Albergues are fun and social but besides the Covid situation, you often don't get good rest there. Buen Camino

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