sunrise on Coastal Route of Portuguese Camino de Santiago
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Portuguese Camino Coastal Route – complete guide

Coastal Route (Caminho da Costa) of Camino Portugues is a beautiful alternative walk to the Central Route. Total distance280km, it starts in Porto follows the coast till Redondela where it joins with the main route. In the beginning, people with albergues and restaurants on the Central Route were not too happy, they worried that it can take away many pilgrims. It did happen, about 30% of people walk the Coastal Route but the Portuguese Way is getting more and more popular in general so every route gets enough people. The Portuguese Camino was our first Camino de Santiago and we enjoyed it so much that two days after completing it we took a bus and decided to walk Camino Primitivo.

For more information on the Portuguese Way of Santiago, cost, packing list, weather, tips, and different route options go to the complete Portuguese Camino guide.  

More information about different Camino de Santiago routes with maps and details you can find in THIS POST.

Main differences between the coastal and the central route

The obvious one the Coastal goes along the sea but it doesn’t mean it literally sticks to the coast all the time, it meanders between the coast, towns, and forest.

There are fewer people here than on the main route.

It’s a bit longer280km  to Santiago compare to 260km on the Central Way.

There is less infrastructure for pilgrims on the Coastal Route. Honestly on the Portuguese side, we didn’t have any problem finding albergues but in Spain, in one or two places there were no real albergues, more hotels. As the route becomes more popular new albergues open every year.

The Coastal Route has less up and downhill walking, it’s basically flat all the way.

Less walking on or along busy roads compare to the central way.

In hot summer months, the Coastal Way is a great option you have constant sea breeze. But on rainy days if it’s very windy this route can become a nightmare. We didn’t have one rainy day in May though.

If you really want to stick to the sea it’s easy there is another trail from Porto – Senda Litoral that goes the same way as the Coastal Way but literally goes along the sea.

It’s possible to start walking the Portuguese Camino in Lisbon.

What to pack for the Portuguese Camino

Detailed Camino de Santiago packing list for different seasons for men and women  you’ll find in this post ↓↓↓↓↓

Camino de Santiago light packing list 2019 – all seasons

Coastal Route top picks

Favorite albergue

Casa do SardaoCarreço (private) – an awesome hostel in an old house with great facilities, very comfortable beds, clean, spacious, with a great vibe and amazing owners. We loved this place so much that stayed for two nights. It can be booked online. Price 13 Euro pp. 

Favorite town

Caminha – the last Portuguese town on the Camino from here you cross to Spain by ferry. Beautiful town with the small and cozy historical center; Parish Church built in the 16th century, beautiful Main Square, narrow cobblestone streets, many cafés and bar with terraces. If you have some time waiting for the ferry walk around the town. You can ask at the ferry station café if you can leave your backpacks there.

Streets of Caminha, Portuguese Camino de Santiago
Charming cobblestone streets of Caminha, the last Portuguese town on the Coastal Route

Favorite walking day

Day 4 from Castelo do Neivo to Carreço. Great uphill walk to Santuario de Santa Luzia at the top of the hill in Viana do Castelo. It was Sunday we saw a beautiful wedding ceremony there. This is followed by a nice walk in the forest downhill to the route. Our favorite part was walking through small coastal villages along high grey stone walls on both sides of the cobblestone road. It felt sometimes like if we were walking through a maze.

Stone walls on the way to Carreço, Portugal
Our favorite big stone walls that look like a magic maze. On the way between Vaina do Castelo to Carreço.

Travel insurance for the Coastal Route

Walking like any other outdoor activity involves a risk of getting an injury or losing some of the gear. It’s always recommended to have travel insurance when you go away. The Portuguese Camino de Santiago is not an exclusion though it’s not a high altitude wild hike through remote areas it’s still a physically challenging experience that involves a long walking distance, carrying a heavy backpack, walking in all sort of weather conditions and on different kind of ground including a lot of walking on the asphalt all these can result in injuries. Make sure you will be able to get medical assistance any time you need. Another reason to have insurance is gear or devices loss or break down. Having travel insurance makes the walk less stressful when you know you’re covered in case of any unpredictable emergencies. Let your insurance company worry about you and your belongings while you enjoy walking the Camino. 

Travel Insurance for Hiking Diving Backpacking and more

Porto the beginning of the walk

Porto is an amazing place to reserve a couple of days before or after the Camino to explore the city. Get lost in the maze of crazy narrow cobblestone streets of Porto, follow them climbing up and down, making unreal U-turns that lead to a quirky dead end. There are so many hidden gems in this city that you can spend weeks wandering around and every day finding new places.

If you have extra time to stay in Porto before you start walking the Camino there are several tour options that will help you to explore and discover this amazing city;

Accommodation in Porto

There are many albergues in the city including one municipal albergue N.S. do Rosario de Vilar for 7,5 Euro and one private albergue Albergue de Peregrinos do Porto for donation (though the guidebook says 10 Euro). We stayed in the second one, it’s nice, clean and very social but quite far from the historical center and Sé Cathedral. To get to the trail you’ll have to take the metro first, the metro station is just around the corner. The municipal albergue is located about the same distance from the cathedral.

If you rather stay in the center there are several nice options from hostels to nice and even luxury hotels. It all depends on your budget.

For a great and budget stay in the heart of Porto (10 min. walk to the cathedral) we’d recommend Yes! Hostel Porto, you won’t be disappointed. The hostel has amazing facilities; dorm beds with curtains, soft mattresses, big lockers, each bed has individual light and outlet. Everything is very clean and neat. The dormitories are for 4 or 5 people only, there is a separate female dorm. Fully equipped kitchen, washing machine, all dorms have AC, wi-fi and more.

More accommodation options in Porto

Budget | O2 HostelStayIN Oporto Musica Guest ApartmentTravel & Live Porto Hostel |

Middle price | Forrester Downtown HouseOporto Downtown Flats | Cozy Sunny Flats |

LuxuryWood Loft | DB Cedofeita ApartmentsPao de Acucar HotelEnjoy Porto Guest House

Portuguese Camino – Coastal Way stages

Day 1. Porto – Labruge, 23,5km

Porto – Matosinhos – Lavra – Labruge.

We started at Sé Cathedral, in the morning walked down to Rio Douro and followed the river all the way out of the city following Senda Litoral. Basically all day you walk along the coastline passing small towns and villages. There are many restaurants and coffee shops on the way where you can stop for coffee or lunch.

Portuguese Camino de Santiago; Senda Litoral, Coastal Route and Central Route from Porto
Different routes of walking out of Porto; Senda Litoral, Coastal Route and Central Route of the Portuguese Camino

As an option you can walk to Vila da Cha, it’s 3 km further, there is a municipal albergue for donation as well.

Highlights

    • The historical center of Porto
  • Beach walk

Labruge

A small coastal town stretched more inland than along the coast

    • Hotels – yes
    • Municipal albergue – yes
    • Private albergue – no
    • ATM – yes
    • Shop – yes
  • Restaurant – yes

Albergue Santiago Labruge, municipal

It’s located inland, 900m from the beach, there is a sign pointing the direction. The place is very nice and neat. Our guide book says there are only 8 beds, in fact, there are 24, they recently opened two more rooms upstairs with 12 beds each. Price – donation.

Facilities

    • Hot water shower – no, we couldn’t get it hot, the hostess wasn’t there, maybe we just didn’t know where to switch the geyser.
    • Wi-fi – yes
    • Kitchen with stove, fridge, pots, plates, etc – yes
    • Washing machine – no, there is a basin for washing
    • Drying rack – yes
    • Towels – no
    • Blankets – yes
    • Location – 4 out of 5, 900m away from the Camino, close to a restaurant, shop, and ATM.
  • Comfort level – 4 out of 5, it there was a hot water shower it would be 5.

Accommodation options along the route*

*Many people asked us about the alternative to albergues accommodation options (private rooms with facilities) so we decided for each stage to add accommodations on the route that are available in the booking system it might be helpful for some of you for planning the walk.

Senda Litoral, walking out of Porto
When we saw this scenery on the first day on the Coastal Way we realized we chose the right route

Day 2. Labruge – Praia Estela (Orbitur), 25,6km

Labruge – Vila Chã – Vila do Conde – Póvoa de Varzim – Aguçadoura – Praia Estrela.

Most of the day you walk along the coast on wooden planks sometimes the route goes through small towns. There are plenty of places to stop for coffee or lunch along the way.

Highlights

    • Vila Cha, a small fisherman village.
    • The historical center of Vila do Conde, beautiful narrow cobblestone streets, churches, old houses.
  • Beach walk.

Praia Estela

It’s basically just a big campsite with many cabins, a restaurant and a small shop at reception.

    • ATM – no
    • Shop – yes
  • Restaurant – yes. They have a special pilgrim dinner menu for 10 euro; starter, main, drinks, dessert.

Campismo Orbitur Rio Alto, private  

There is no albergue here, we stayed in a cabin with a shared bathroom. Cabins are nice but there is no kitchen here, you can buy basic stuff in a small shop or eat in a local restaurant where you can get hot water for tea or noodles. Price – cabin with shared bathroom – 16 Euro for two people; 14 Euro for one. There are cabins with bathroom for 20+ Euro. Note! This place is in booking.com but it’s more expensive to book a double cabin online, they offer only more expensive cabins with bathroom and kitchen and I guess they have a special price for pilgrims as well. Though if you’re a group of people you can book online a caravan for 5 or 6 adults the price is not bad.

Facilities

    • Hot water shower – yes
    • Wi-fi – yes, only in the reception area
    • Kitchen – no
    • Washing machine – no
    • Drying rack – no
    • Towels – no
    • Blankets – yes
    • Extra – each cabin has a fridge and a small dining area
    • Location – 4 out of 5, not far from the way.
  • Comfort level – 4 out of 5

Accommodation along the route

Day 3. Praia Estela – Castelo do Neiva, 24,4km

Praia Estela – Apúlia – Fão – Esposende – Marinhas – Belinho – Ponte – Castelo do Neiva.

It was a nice mix of walking through the towns, along the coast and a little on the forest path.

Highlights

    • Confeteria (pastry) Marbella in Esposende, great place with some delicious cakes and pastry.
    • Cafe/bar O Lampao in Belinho, an awesome place with hundreds scarfs, mugs and key chains hanging from the ceiling and walls.
  • A small waterfall at the river cross just before Castelo do Neiva

Castelo do Neiva

A small town a little bit away from the sea with a new albergue, a restaurant, and a shop.

    • ATM – no
    • Shop – yes
  • Restaurant – yes

Albergue de Castelo do Neiva, municipal

New albergue, not in a guide book yet, right on the Camino, very nice, clean and neat. The owners are very friendly and helpful, speak some English. A local restaurant just 200m away. Capacity – 20 people. Price 5 Euro per person including bedding.

Facilities

    • Hot water shower – yes
    • Wi-fi – no, might get it in the future.
    • Kitchen with stove, fridge, pots, plates etc – yes
    • Washing machine – no
    • Drying rack – yes
    • Towels – no
    • Blankets – yes
    • Extra – coffee and chocolate vending machine.
    • Location – 5 out of 5
  • Comfort level – 5 out of 5

Accommodation along the route

Fishermen village, Portuguese Coastal Camino
Traditional fishermen village with colorful houses, Coastal Route of Camino de Santiago

Day 4. Castelo do Neiva – Carreço, 19km

Castelo do Neiva – Chafé – Viana do Castelo – Areosa – Carreço.

A nice and relaxed day of walking through endless towns and villages with plenty of restaurants and pastries to stop for breakfast, lunch or coffee. If you decide to walk up to Santuario Santa Luzia in Viana do Castelo add to the day distance 3km. 

Highlights

    • Old high stone walls covered in moss and ivy, we loved it.
  • Santuário de Santa Luzia de Viana do Castelo, it sits on the top of the mountain, quite a steep and long uphill, the view from the top is awesome. This walk is optional, the route doesn’t go up to the top.

Carreço

A typical small town with an albergue, a couple of pensions, a restaurant, and a small shop.

    • ATM – no
    • Shop – yes
  • Restaurant – yes

Albergue Casa do Sardao, private

All day walking past old houses with thick fortress-like walls we were wondering how it’s to live inside one of these houses. At the end of the day, we got a chance to experience it ourselves. The Albergue is a modernized house of the 16th century with thick stone walls, built forever. The place is just awesome, an old house with great modern facilities, super cozy. The owner can drive guests to a supermarket as it’s quite far to walk. The staff here speaks good English, everybody is very friendly and helpful. Beds are very comfortable with real bedding (not disposable one), soft mattresses, light, and warm blankets. In season we’d suggest to book it beforehand the place is very popular. It can be booked online. Price 12 Euro per person, 13 Euro if book online. Capacity – 22 people.

Facilities

It basically has everything you need and even more, we loved this place and stayed here for two nights.

    • Hot water shower – yes
    • Wi-fi – yes
    • Kitchen with stove, fridge, pots, plates – yes
    • Washing machine – yes, 2 euro per load
    • Drying rack – yes
    • Towels – yes
    • Blankets – yes
    • Extra – fireplace, TV, lounge area, beer, wine, coffee for sale. You can order dinner here.
    • Location – 5 out of 5, right on the way
  • Comfort level – 5 out of 5, very comfortable beds, great facilities, very clean.

Accommodation along the route

Santuario de Santa Luzia, Viana do Casetlo, Portugal
Santuario de Santa Luzia, Viana do Casetlo, Portugal

Day 5. Carreço, Portugal – A Guarda, Spain, 22,7km

Carreço – Vila Praia de Âncora – Caminha – ferry to A Guarda.

Nice walk with slight up and down hills through the forest, towns, along the coast.

Ferry from Caminha to A Guarda (pier)

Timetable depends on tides, sometimes first ferry leaves at 8 am sometimes at 2 pm, there are 4 or six ferries daily. The ride takes 5 minutes, 1,5 Euro pp. If there are no ferries or you don’t want to wait you can take a small boat, 5 Euro pp. Boats don’t go if the wind is too strong. Once crossed to Spain don’t forget to change the time, +1 hour.

Alternative! From Caminha instead of continuing on the Coastal Route and taking a ferry you can continue walking along the river towards Valença/Tui and join the Central Route there.

  • Day 5. Carreço – Caminha, 20km
  • Day 6. Caminha, Portugal – Valença, Portugal/Tui, Spain, 30km.

Highlights

    • 6th-century convent Sao Joao de Cabanas, 30min. walk Carreço
    • The historical center of Caminho; the castle, narrow cobblestone streets.
  • Castillo (castle) de Santa Cruz in A Guarda

A Guarda

Quite a big town with a nice castle in the middle, from the castle you have a nice view of the area. No entrance fee.

    • ATM – no
    • Supermarket – yes
  • Restaurant – yes

Albergue Peregrinos, municipal

A nice albergue with a great host, good facilities, clean and comfortable. It can accommodate 40 people. Price 5 Euro pp. including bedding. Close to the castle, supermarkets, restaurants.

Facilities

    • Hot water shower – yes
    • Wi-fi – yes.
    • Kitchen with stove, fridge, pots, plates – yes
    • Washing machine – no
    • Drying rack – yes
    • Towels – no
    • Blankets – yes
    • Location – 5 out of 5, right on the way
  • Comfort level – 4 out of 5

Accommodation on the route

Day 6. A Guarda – A Ramallosa, 33km

A Guarda – Oia – Viladesuso – Mougas – Baiona – Nigran/A Ramallosa.

A long walking day most of the time following the coastline past small towns, on the second half the trail goes uphill through the beautiful forest from where you have amazing views of the coast and a lighthouse.

Highlights

  • Old Town of Baiona; churches, cobblestone streets, many street cafés.

Ramallosa

A nice town by the sea though we didn’t walk around too much as it was quite a long day of walking.

    • ATM – yes
    • Supermarket – yes
  • Restaurant – yes

Albergue Pazo Pias, private

It’s more of a hotel than albergue the rooms for pilgrims are located in the old monastery, the rooms are ex cellars, don’t expect too much. It’s very basic though the rooms are private; double and single with shared bathrooms. Capacity 40 people. Price 15 Euro pp.

Facilities

    • Hot water shower – yes
    • Wi-fi – yes
    • Kitchen – no, only a microwave, few cups, and plates
    • Washing machine – no
    • Drying rack – yes
    • Towels – yes
    • Blankets – yes
    • Location – 5 out of 5, right on the way
  • Comfort level – 4 out of 5, rooms are quite small and very basic

Accommodation on the route

Lighthouse Silleiro, Coastal Way, Spain
View on lighthouse Silleiro and the coast from the hill on the way to A Ramallosa

Day 7. A Ramallosa – Vigo, 21,5km

Short day, some up and down hills, a little bit of walking through the outskirts of Vigo.

There are no albergues in Vigo you have an option skipping Vigo completely and staying in an albergue in Freixo, 5 Euro or staying in a hotel/hostel in Vigo. Freixo is a little detour about 3km in total, there is nothing there only albergue. You can bring your own food or phone them beforehand and ask to make lunch or dinner for you.

Highlights

  • Castle in Vigo

Vigo

It’s a big city and considered to be one of the must-visit places in the part of Spain but to be honest we were not impressed too much we even regretted a little bit coming here instead of going to Freixo, it was too much of city walking to get in and out of Vigo and except for the castle we didn’t find much else to see. Plus it was a public holiday and all the supermarkets and shops were closed. If you have some extra days to stay in Vigo you can go to the small Cíes islands near the city, they are beautiful; white sand beaches, hills, forest trails, you can even dive there. To get to the islands go to the harbor of Vigo. 

    • ATM – yes
    • Supermarket – yes
  • Restaurant – yes

Hotel Chipen

It’s close to the route, clean rooms with a private bathroom, close to the restaurants and cafés but far from the historical center, 2,5 km. Price 40 Euro for a double. There is a nice restaurant nearby Florida Grill, where you can get Brazilian churrasco (plate of different meat with salads, fries, and rice. We shared one big churrasco, took a couple of beers and coffee and our bill was 22 Euro.

Facilities

    • Hot water shower – yes
    • Wi-fi – yes.
    • Kitchen – no
    • Washing machine – no
    • Drying rack – no
    • Towels – yes
    • Blankets – yes
    • Location – 4 out of 5, close to the trail
  • Comfort level – 5 out of 5, not a luxury place but quite comfortable and clean

Accommodation on the route

VigoEurostars Mar de VigoHostal RealHotel Vigo PlazaHotel Alda Estación VigoHotel NáuticoApartamentos Porta do Sol Vigo |

Forest, Coastal Way, Spain
Coastal Route sometimes takes you through a beautiful lush forest

Day 8. Vigo – Redondela, 16,3km

The Camino Central and the Coastal route join in Redondela, don’t be surprised to see many people around. Though the distance is very short this day you can add to it a couple of extra km to get out of Vigo back to the trail. 

Highlights

  • Beautiful panoramic views on bridge Ponte de Rande, the sea and the Cíes islands. 
  • Small waterfall in the forest.

Redondela

A nice town with many coffee shops and many bars and restaurants with outside tables, a great place to chat with other pilgrims, chill and drink a beer. There are several albergues in the town, one municipal and a couple of private as well as hotels and pensions.

    • ATM – yes
    • Supermarket – yes
  • Restaurant – yes

Albergue Casa da Torre, municipal

A big old tower with thick walls turned into an albergue, quite cozy, neat, clean and spacious. Thanks to these thick walls in summer it’s always nice and cool inside. Capacity 44 people. Price 6 Euro pp including disposable bedding.

Facilities

    • Hot water shower – yes
    • Wi-fi – no
    • Kitchen with cooking plates, microwave – yes, no pots, cups, plates, utensils.
    • Washing machine – yes, price between 1,5-3 Euro per load, depending on weight.
    • Drying rack – yes
    • Towels – no
    • Blankets – no
    • Extras – drying machine, 1,5 Euro per load.
    • Location – 5 out of 5
  • Comfort level – 4 out of 5, the kitchen was quite a disappointment, we couldn’t even make tea there was no kettle or even cup to boil water in.

Accommodation on the route

RedondelaHospedaje Bahía de San SimonRua do MedioO Descansiño LaxeAlvear Suites |

Vigo, Portuguese Coastal Camino
View on the bridge and the coast on the Coastal Way from Vigo to Redondela

Day 9. Redondela – Pontevedra, 21km

Redondela – Cesantes – Arcade – Balteiro – Pontevedra.

Note! According to the new rules for the last 100 km to Santiago de Compostela you need two stamps per day (you can get a second stamp in bars and restaurants on the way) in order to get the Compostela. 

Easy walk with small uphills, through the forest, along the road, and through small towns. A couple of kilometers before Pontevedra take the river trail instead of following the road, it’s not longer but more picturesque.

Highlights

  • The historical center of Pontevedra

Pontevedra

It’s a nice city with many supermarkets, a beautiful cathedral, a nice Old Town, many restaurants and bars.  

    • ATM – yes
    • Supermarket – yes
  • Restaurant – yes

Albergue La Virgen Peregrina, municipal

Great place, with all you need, spacious, clean and well organized, it has a nice garden great for chilling on the grass. Opens at 1 pm. Capacity 60 people. Price 6 Euro pp. including bedding.

Facilities

    • Hot water shower – yes
    • Wi-fi – yes
    • Kitchen with stove, microwave, cutlery, pots, cups etc. – yes, one of the best kitchens on this Camino.
    • Washing machine – yes, 3 Euro per load
    • Drying rack – yes
    • Towels – no
    • Blankets – no
    • Extras – big dining area with many tables and chairs, cool drink and snack vending machine.
    • Location – 4 out of 5, right on the trail but about 1km from the city center.
  • Comfort level – 5 out of 5

Accommodation on the route

Cathedral on Camino Portugues, Spain
Difficult to count how many cathedrals, churches, and monasteries we saw on the Portuguese Camino and all of them have a history to tell

Day 10. Pontevedra – Caldas de Reis, 23km

A nice and easy walking day through the forest, small town and villages. At 3,6km there is a sign where the route splits here starts an optional Variante Espiritual Route that joins the main Camino 3 day later in Padrón. Check below the Spiritual way stages.

Highlights

  • A beautiful waterfall in Parque Natural Ría Barosa, between Portela and Briallos, it’s a small detour but the waterfall is worth of visit.
  • Hot springs of Caldas de Reis.

Caldas de Reis

A nice town with hot springs, old churches, and some Roman ruins. If you have time you can relax in hot springs in one of the balnearios (spas). There are several albergues in Caldas de Reis from all that we’ve read we can recommend not to stay at Posada Doña Urraca, people say it’s quite dirty. We didn’t stay here as we took the Spiritual Route from Pontevedra.

Accommodation in Caldas de Reis

Albergue O CruceiroAlbergue Agarimo | Alojamiento Caldas de ReisHotel Roquiño |

Day 11. Caldas de Reis – Padrón, 20km

A pleasant short day of walking with a slight hill that starts 3km after Caldas. There are many bars and restaurants on the way. If you want you can walk a bit further this day to make the last day shorter, there are many albergues and hostels all the way to Santiago. For more information on Padrón go to Day 12 of Spiritual Route.

Accommodation on the route

Variante Espiritual/Spiritual Way (optional route). Days 10-12

The Spiritual Way goes back to the coast, the name ‘spiritual’ refers to the origin of the route that is believed to follow the way the rest of apostle St. James was transferred to Santiago in 44AD. The route starts in Pontevedra and finished in Padron, total distance 73km. It consists of 3 stages; 2 walking stages (Pontevedra to Armenteira and Armenteira to Vilanova de Arousa) and 1 boat ride (Vilanova de Arousa to Iria Flavia, close to Padron). This marine route is considered to be the origin of all the Caminos de Santiago. 

Spiritual Way and Central Route, the Portuguese Camino de Santiago
Two route options on the Camino Portugues from Pontevedra to Padron; the Central Route and the Spiritual Way.

Day 10. Pontevedra – Armenteira, 22km

Pontevedra – Campañó – Combarro – Armenteira.

We decided to walk the alternative route Variante Espiritual it takes you through vineyards, small towns, and villages and back to the coast. And it was another chance to go away from busy Central Route. The trail splits at 3,7km from Pontevedra, there will be a big sign “Variante Espiritual” pointing left toward Combarro, you won’t miss it. From Combarro the route climbs all the way to the top of the mountains to Armenteira, 400m up.

Our guidebook predicted a long steep uphill for the day, in fact, it wasn’t very steep on the gravel road to the top of the mountain and then a little bit down to the village. Make sure you carry enough water before starting the uphill walk, you can ask to fill your bottles in one of the cafés in Combarro.

Highlights

    • Centre of Combarro, a cozy little town with nice coffee shops and bakeries by the sea.
    • Beautiful view on the area on the way up
  • Monastery of Armenteira

Armenteira

Armenteira is a small village built around the monastery, it’s the main attraction and the reason people from nearby towns come here on weekends. There are two restaurants but no shops, not even a small one. If you don’t want to eat in a restaurant buy food in Pontevedra, just remember there are no cooking plates in the hostel.

    • ATM – no
    • Shop – no
  • Restaurant – yes

Albergue de Armenteira, municipal

A brand new albergue with good facilities, clean and comfortable. Opens at 1 pm. Capacity 33 people. Price 6 Euro pp.

Facilities

    • Hot water shower – yes
    • Wi-fi – yes
    • Kitchen with microwave, cutlery, pots, cups, etc. – yes, no cooking stove
    • Washing machine – yes, 3 euro for washing
    • Drying rack – yes
    • Towels – no
    • Blankets – yes
    • Extras – dining area, each bed has a personal light, snack vending machine.
    • Location – 5 out of 5
  • Comfort level – 5 out of 5

Accommodation on the route

Combarro | Hotel XeitoCasa NoelmarPISO EN COMBARROCasa Da Chousa |

Day 11. Armenteira – Vilanova de Arousa, 23km

Armenteira – Barrantes – Ribadumia – Pontearnelas – Villanueva de Arousa.

In the beginning, you follow La Ruta de la Piedra y del Agua (The Route of Stone and Water), there are not many traditional marks (yellow arrows) for the Camino de Santiago but they go the same way for about 2 hours. In the beginning, the trail goes through the forest, along the small river,  with some randomly placed rock sculptures this part was very beautiful. Then it turns into the fields and vineyards, a little bit through villages and towns.

Highlights

    • Ruta de la Piedra y del Agua; beautiful forest walk
  • Countryside scenery, vineyards

Vilanova de Arousa

Quite a big sea town with a couple of interesting churches.

    • ATM – yes
    • Supermarket – yes
  • Restaurant – yes

Albergue de Arousa, municipal 

It’s located in a sports complex which wasn’t too great as people played basketball till after 11 pm and we could hear everything. Opens at 1 pm. Price 6 Euro pp including bedding. Capacity – it has about 20 beds if there is not enough space for pilgrims they put mattresses on the floor in the spare room. It looks like even if there are many people there will be space for everybody. You can buy a boat ticket here, it costs the same as at the pier.

Facilities

    • Hot water shower – yes
    • Wi-fi – yes
    • Kitchen with microwave, stove, cutlery, pots, cups etc. – yes
    • Washing machine – yes, 3 euro per load
    • Drying rack – yes
    • Towels – no
    • Blankets – yes
    • Extras – dining area, snacks vending machine.
    • Location – 5 out of 5
  • Comfort level – 4 out of 5.

Accommodation on the route

Stone Cross on Variante Espiritual of Camino Portuguese
One of 17 crosses on the Spiritual Route you’ll see all of them if you take a boat

Day 12. Vilanova de Arousa – Padrón by boat, 28km

From here most people if not everybody take a boat, the boat follows the original way the body of St. James was transported to Santiago. Boat coasts 19 Euro pp., the ride takes 1 hour. It usually leaves in the morning from the pier, 5min. walk from the albergue, depending on tides sometimes it departs at 7 am, sometimes at 10 am. Depending on the number of pilgrims there might be one or two boats. The boat goes past 17 crosses that are placed on small rocky islands along the river the boat route is called Traslatio Xacobeo. Apparently, the boat ride is very beautiful. From where the boat arrives it’s about 2km more to Padrón. 

We decided to walk to Padrón to check out the route and we sincerely recommend you to take a boat, most of the time we walked along the road, only at the end, we had some nice forest walk. We did see some of the crosses on the way but not from close-by. If you follow the arrows the walking distance is about 36km, if you want to cut it you must walk along the highway all the way to Padrón. Conclusion – don’t walk.

Some people are worried that it’s cheating to take a boat instead of walking but it’s not.  You walk the same two days as people on the Central route just instead of adding a long walking day you have a pleasant boat ride. Plus it gives you the possibility to progress a little bit further towards Santiago on that day. Getting off the boat you can walk 10 km or so there are many albergues on the way. On the last day, you have only 15 km to walk to Santiago.

Highlights

    • Via de los Cruzes – 17 rock crosses along the river
  • The historical center of Padrón

Padrón

Beautiful town with a stunning pedestrian street, cathedral, and churches. There are several restaurants and cafes nearby, some open very early in the morning for pilgrims. 

    • ATM – yes
    • Supermarket – yes
  • Restaurant – yes

Albergue de Peregrinos de Padrón, municipal 

Big, clean, well-organized albergue with a lot of space, one big dormitory with many bunk beds. Opens at 1 pm. Capacity 46 people. Price 6 Euro pp. including bedding. Located right at the cathedral, close to the restaurants and shops.

Facilities

    • Hot water shower – yes
    • Wi-fi – yes
    • Kitchen with, microwave, stove, cutlery, pots, cups – yes
    • Washing machine – no, washing basin only
    • Drying rack – yes
    • Towels – no
    • Blankets – no
    • Extras – dining area.
    • Location – 5 out of 5
  • Comfort level – 5 out of 5

Accommodation on the route

PadrónCruces de IriaCasa da AldeaHotel Chef RiveraResiliente Apartment I |

Padrón, Coastal Route of Portuguese Way
Stunning square in front of the cathedral in Padrón.

Day 12/Day 13. Padrón – Santiago de Compostela, 25km

Padrón – Iria Flavia – A Esclavitude – Picaraña – Milladoiro – Santiago de Compostela.

A very exciting day some people from our albergue started very early. There were quite a few food places in the town opened by 6.30am you can have breakfast on the way. The trail most of the time goes through the forest and small towns. There are many albergues and hotels for pilgrims on the way between Padrón and Santiago as well as cafés and restaurants. The last couple of kilometers to the cathedral through the city I  don’t remember well we were very excited.

Accommodation on the route

Arriving in Santiago de Compostela is an absolutely thrilling experience, you see pilgrims from different Caminos coming here; walking or cycling, taking off their backpacks and sitting around Plaza del Obradoiro  (the Obradoiro square) in front of the cathedral, everybody is very excited, hugging, shaking hands, crying, smiling. You see here people you met somewhere on the way, it’s an amazing feeling to be part of this pilgrims’ crowd! You made it, now it’s time to chill, relax and celebrate of course, luckily there are hundreds of bars and restaurants around! And don’t forget to get your Compostela at the Pilgrim’s Office in Santiago. 

If you want to know more about the cathedral and its history you can join Santiago de Compostela Cathedral and Museum Guided Tour.

If after completing the Portuguese Camino you still feel strong you can continue walking from Santiago de Compostela to Finisterre/Muxía, a beautiful 3-4-day walk to “the end of the world”. As an option, you can do a day tour from Santiago and visit both capes Finisterre and Muxía.

More tours and activities in Santiago de Compostela

Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Santiago de Compostela, the end of the Camino. We made it!

Accommodation in Santiago de Compostela

We’d suggest booking accommodation in Santiago in advance especially in summer as the best places might be fully booked. We didn’t book anything and couldn’t find a budget place to stay for two nights, the next day we had to move to a different albergue. 

I believe by the time you are finished with the Camino you might not feel like staying in albergues anymore, which is understandable, we all need some privacy. There are hundreds of hotels and pensions in Santiago for different budgets.

Budget | Santiago KM-0 | Blanco Albergue | Albergue the Last Stamp | Pension Residencia Universitaria Rey |

Middle price | Pension Residencia Fonseca | Hotel Alda AlgaliaHotel PR La Paz | Os Sobrinos do Pai | Hostal Suso |

Luxury  | Hotel Casa Lois | Nova Compostela Apartments | Hotel Praza Quintana | Parador de Santiago Hostal Reis Catolicos Hotel Eurostars Araguaney |

Nova Compostela Apartments, Santiago de Compostela
Private garden, Nova Compostela Apartments, Santiago de Compostela. @booking.com

Items we love taking on the Camino

Recommended books and guidebooks

    • Ordinary MagicPromises I Kept to My Mother Through Life, Illness, and a Very Long Walk on the Camino de Santiago by Cameron Powell.  Paperback. 

Useful apps for the  Camino Portuguese

Portuguese Way Premium. Cost US$4, available for Android and Apple.

Camino Assist Pilgrim Santiago. Free download, available for Android and Apple.

Buen Camino de Santiago. Free download, available for Android and Apple.

Wisely + Camino Portugues; a Wise Pilgrim guide. Cost US$6, available for Android and Apple. We haven’t used it but I saw many unhappy users complaining about the app, I’d recommend reading the reviews before buying it.

Related posts

Disclosure: Stingy Nomads take part in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program. We earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. If you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission at no extra cost for you. Thank You!

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86 Comments

  1. Hi STINGY!
    I am so happy thatvi found your website in June. Reading your articles and posts helped me a lot to slowly slowly collect and organise my backpack for Portuguese Coastal Camio. It will be my first trekking walk for so long abroad. I am starting in middle of September from Sofia, Bulgaria. I am willing to walk from Porto to Santiago and then to do the day trip to Fisterra. I wanted to ask you if you would recommend to have more warm clothes with me , than really summer once for September by the sea. My whole luggage is 9 kg and I am doubting if will be OK to carry it on 22 days . I am thinking how to make it lighter. One more question to you -is it safe to leave my backpack not locked in hostels for a night?
    Thanks for your reply

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Dessislava! Thank you for the comment! I’m walking the French Camino right now and I must say in the morning it’s very chilly, I wear a T-shirt and a fleece I’d recommend taking a fleece or a long sleeve hiking shirt and a rain jacket. 9km is pretty heavy, I’d say 6kg is enough don’t bring any unnecessary stuff with; two sets of hiking clothes, fleece, rain jacket, something for sleeping and a pair of flip flops pretty much all you need. The backpack is fine but always try to keep your valuable stuff (money, phone etc.) with you or close by, never leave it unattended when going to the shower or toilet. I haven’t heard of anybody’s backpack getting stolen by I did hear stores or stolen money and phones. Many albergues have lockers if it’s the case just lock your valuables there.
      Buen Camino!

  2. Hi there Nomads,
    I am planning on my Coastal Camino I mid September. Have you guys mailed any items back to the USA? If so do have any tips for mailing items back? Thanks.

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Robin! We didn’t mail anything back we stored our extra luggage at the hostel in Lisbon where we stayed for a couple of days (we walked from Lisbon to Porto first) and fetched it after 3 weeks or so, they didn’t even charge us anything for storage.
      Cheers!

  3. I would like the pdf that you refer to; however; the pop-up does not appear to access it. Is it possible to receive it via email?

  4. Excellent blog – thank you forall the info I need. Can’t imagine I need a guide book!

  5. Well one thing you are certainly not stingy with is helpful information! Thanks so much! I have back problems and when I travel I usually put my backpack on a little camping trolley for easier carrying. Are the paths on this route suitable for this, ie flat (ish) surface as opposed to gravelly/stony paths? I know you say there’s boardwalk so apart from this I mean. Thanks a million, Louise.

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Louise! Thank you very much for the comment! I think out of all the Caminos the Coastal Route is the best for walking with a trolley. You walk on sidewalk or boardwalk or cobblestones (in some towns) basically all the time, except some parts on the last day from Padron to Santiago where you do get a little bit of walking through the forest but besides that, it’s a solid surface all the way. I’m sure you’ll enjoy the Camino!

      • Great, thanks so much!

        • Memry lê Roux

          Good day
          Can you please recommend a guesthouse to sleep about 3km before Padron?Thanks
          Memry

          • Stingy Nomads

            Hello! Dear, Memry, please, check the post again, there are suggested accommodation options at the end of every day. Go to Day 11. Caldas de Reis to Padron, there is a paragraph Accommodation on the route, there you’ll find a place named Puentecesuras which is about 3km before Padron if you click on the hotel name (A Casa do Rio) it’ll open a booking window where you can book that place. To see more options in the area click “show on map” (under the name of the hotel) and it’ll open a map with all the available accommodations.
            Regards

  6. Hello Stingy Nomads

    Thanks a ton for this super useful post! We are looking into walking the Coastal Route with our two toddlers and will happily let you know how that went upon completion 🙂

    We really appreciate all the time and effort you put into your blog!

    Sunny regards from the Swiss Alps! The Raasta Family

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Sabine! Thank you for the feedback! What a great idea to walk the Camino with kids! I’m sure you’ll have an amazing time! We love the Swiss Alps, the scenery in Switzerland is breathtaking! Planning to do some hikes there next year! Looking forward to hearing about your Camino experience!
      Buen Camino!

  7. Hi, your info was really helpful and made the route seem very accessible to a novice Camino-er, possibly doing it solo! I am planning to stay in a mixture of hotels and albergues on the Portuguese track. Do you know if it is possible to meet up and eat evening meal with other pilgrims at the albergue they’re staying at I’m not staying there?

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Amanda! Thank you for the comment! It depends on the albergue, you can probably ask the hospitalero (a person in charge) if it’s possible or not. Not all public albergues have good kitchen facilities and a dining room, for this reason, people often go out for dinner I’m sure you can join them then.
      Buen Camino!

  8. Thanks for the great info! Would you be able to send me the pdf too? Hoping to walk next May!

  9. Sandra Barkhuizen

    Hello fellow South African’s. I’m doing the trail in July and just wanted to say thank you for your posts. It’s helped me build my itinerary. You guys are awesome.

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Sandra! Thank you very much for the feedback! We hope you’ll enjoy the Coastal Route!
      Buen Camino!

  10. Hi guys, I really enjoyed reading your blog. I can’t find the downloadable PDF file, can you tell me it is.
    Thanks
    Pete

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Pete! Thank you for the comment! You can download the PDF file from the pop-up subscription form that appears after you spend about 2 minutes on the page.
      Buen Camino!

      • ondrej elterlein

        Hello, thank you for the web and all the information here. I also can’t find the downloadable files. No subscription pop-up. I tried to enter my e-mail address and subscribe from the main page, but nothing. Can you help or send it to me?
        Thank you!

  11. Emily Rae Taylor

    Hey Guys,

    I hope you’re well. My husband and I are planning to hike the coastal route starting around the 24th of June. Do you know if we can get the credentials at the church in Porto? I think I have read somewhere that you can but i wanted to double check. Also, do you think we will be fine to just walk and show up at albergues at this time of year? I have read that you said its first in first served, just wanted to see if it was still the case at this time of year. I am a bit nervous about it haha!

    Thanks,

    Emily

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Emily! We’re great continuing our Camino adventure, just finished the Camino Ingles. As I remember you can get credentials at the cathedral in Porto or at one of the albergue. If you walk out of Porto following the Litoral Way (along the coast) there will be an information office on the way where you can get a stamp, I think they sell credentials as well so you have a couple of places in Porto I’m sure at least one of them will have it.
      Public albergues can’t be booked beforehand regardless the season but you can book private albergues they’re more expensive and usually have better facilities. You can always try public albergues first and if there is no space go to one of the private places, there are usually a couple of them around.
      Buen Camino!

  12. Thanks for such a great post! Two questions:

    I did part of the Frances in September/October 2017 and we spent about 35E pp/pd, not being careful but not being crazy; do you think that seems about right for the Portugese as well?

    On the Coastal route, is there a lot of walking on sand/on the beach, or is it paths/roads near the water?

    Thanks!

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Dani! Thank you for the comment! We definitely spent less than 35 Euro on the Portuguese Camino but we stayed in public albergues most of the time and cooked our own food though we stopped quite a lot for coffee. I think 35 Euro will be enough for the Camino. We just finished the English Way our budget was about 25 Euro per person per day. As for sand there was no walking on sand at all unless you decide to go down to the beach, most of the time you walk on boardwalks or sidewalk along the beach.
      Buen Camino!

  13. Thanks so much for the information on this route guys! Specially the coastal and spiritual variants.
    I’ve done 2 Caminos before: Frances and Primitivo, and I was sceptical about doing the Portugues because I could only find information on the ‘central’ way and it seems like too much asphalt and city walking, but now you’ve convinced me and we’ll be walking from Porto to Santiago at the end of August and adding a couple of days to the Cies Islands at the end for a well-deserved rest! (I went after my first 5-week Camino and it was amazing). Anyway, I just wanted to say thanks so much and buen camino! 🙂

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Sol! Thank you very much for the comment! We enjoyed walking the Coastal route from Porto it’s always nice to walk by the sea. We did the Primitivo and the Coastal route last year May-June, both routes are beautiful and very different. I’ve heard a lot about Cies islands but we never got around to visit them. I hope you’ll like the Coastal route!
      Buen Camino!

  14. Maria dos Santos

    Hello fellow South Africans!!
    I am EXTREMELY interested in doing the coastal trip. Did you do the on your own or through a walking tour?

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Maria! We like the majority of pilgrims on the Camino routes did it on our own without any company or tour involved. The route is well-marked, there is enough infrastructure (accommodation, restaurants, shops, ATMs etc.), it’s safe to walk alone etc. Some people do it in a group but most pilgrims do it independently.
      Cheers!

  15. Thank you so much for such an informative post. We are walking the coastal route in Early september and plan to have our luggage transported. I gather from your previous replies we will need to stay at private albergues. From your experience, would we be wise to pack sleeping bags? Also, would you recommend wearing high visibility vests? we are reading some information which says this is mandatory in Spain if walking in the dark.

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Kathy! Yes, usually the luggage delivery can be arranged between private albergues and hotels, public albergue don’t want to be responsible for the luggage and they can’t be booked so even if your luggage is there but there are no beds when you arrive in person you won’t get a bed and will have to walk with your luggage and try to find a place to stay.
      We stayed most of the times in public albergues and some of them didn’t have blankets, private albergues always have blankets or duvets if you’re going to stay in private albergues I think it’s not necessary to carry a sleeping bag.
      We have never had high visibility vests on the Camino and didn’t really see people wearing them. As I know it’s compulsory to have in your car (for drivers) but we didn’t see any signs saying it’s compulsory for pilgrims it might be recommended. If you’re planning to walk in the dark it’s better to have a piece of clothing or a backpack cover with a reflection part on it for safety reasons. We did walk in the dark not much but we never had any problem. Hope it helps!
      Buen Camino!

  16. Annie Yang

    Hi Stingy…Love your blog..so detail and nice pic. I am planning to walk Cmino Portugues. for 8 or 7 days in December. I saw you did the coastal and central route. Which route you will recommend> Thank you. Annie

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Annie! Thank you for the comment! We prefer walking by the sea and liked the Coastal route more but if you’re going to walk in December I’d suggest to decide which route to walk based on the weather conditions if it’s cold, windy or rainy the Coastal Route won’t be that nice. I would recommend to start walking along the coast (it’s the best way to walk out of Porto) and see how it goes there are a couple of connections between the Coastal and the Central routes you can always switch.
      Buen Camino!

  17. Kirsty Willis

    Thank you so much for all the information you have provided. It’s a gold mine!
    Cheers!
    from Wellington, NZ

  18. This is great information. Thank you for such a well set out, accessible blog

  19. Hi I plan on doing the costal route from porto to santagio from July 7 to 18th .There will be five of us 2 parents 3children. Aged 25yrs female16y fale 14 yrs boy .y .Is it possible for all of us to stay together . Also. My son is coeliac .
    Any advice to ensure he has plenty food along the way .
    Angela

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Angela! July is busy time for the Coastal Route sometimes it might be difficult to find 5 spots in public albergues unless you arrive early enough before the majority of pilgrims. Most stops on the route have one public and at least one private albergue those are usually more expensive between 10 and 12 Euro pp. but you’ll have better chances to get 5 spots there. I’d suggest to walk first to a public albergue and check if there is space for all of you if not go to a private one. Some of the private albergues can be booked over the phone you always can phone a day before your arrival and book 5 beds. A Pilgrim’s guide to the Camino Portugues by Brierley (check for the recommended book at the end of this post) has all the albergues and hotels on the route with the phone numbers. In the albergues they usually know what kind of accommodation options you can get on the next day, how big are the albergues etc.
      Buen Camino!

  20. Nancy Harlan

    I have seen people ride horses on the Camino. In fact, I rode a horse on the Camino Frances a few years ago.

  21. Hi,
    I am very new for such pilgrimage and as a beginner i would do it for short like 3-4 days over eastern holidays. I will reach in Porto on 19th April morning. I will take my flight back on 22nd April around 9 am also from Porto.
    I am curious if i do average 20-25 km a day, which destination might be best for me to take a bus or train early morning back to Porto on 22nd April.
    Thanks.
    Sunil

  22. Nadine Neukirch

    Hello, thank you for sharing all this information this blog was very helpful! I plan to walk the coastal Portuguese camino route in May 2019 solo. I am wanting to do about 7 days walking and wondering if you recommend any particular part of the camino route for these 7 days? Thank you!

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Nadine! Thank you for the comment! I liked the Portuguese part of the route the most, you can start in Porto and finish in Vigo, it’ll take about 7 days. If you want to finish in Santiago then it’s better to start in Caminha you’ll need about 7 days to walk to Santiago.
      Buen Camino!

  23. Hii :))
    Love this post!! I’m curious to know whether you guys booked any hostels, albergues, hotel etc. stays before planning your trip. Or what other things you anticipated/planned/booked before going. I’ll be walking my first Camino this year and I am nervous as to not finding a place to sleep upon arrival to my different destionations haha (hope this is a common fear:)
    My boyfriend and I will be starting in Baiona and will follow the same track as this post.

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Mathilde! Thank you for the comment! We didn’t book anything in advance but I’m sure many people who walk the Camino for the first time have the same fear about not finding a place to sleep. We’ve never had this problem on any Camino route. Public albergues can’t be booked in advance at all, they work on principal first come first serve, private albergues and hostels can be booked beforehand. As I remember from Baiona on there are quite a lot of places to stay; public and private albergues, hotels etc. I’m sure you’ll be able to find a place. Most pilgrims go to public or municipal albergues because they are the cheapest accommodation on the route (5-6 Euro per bed), private albergues charge between 10-12 Euro, a private room in a hotel will be more expensive. People on the Camino that work in albergues are very helpful I don’t think they’ll let someone just stay on the street.
      Buen Camino!

  24. what do you think of this route:
    24 June – Arrival in Porto(Not included)
    Accommodation in a 3*Hotel – Accommodation and breakfast

    25 June – Free day in Porto
    Meeting with a member of our team for a briefing and to collect the documentation.
    Accommodation in a 3*Hotel – Accommodation and breakfast

    26 June – Transfer: Porto – Matosinhos – 1st Stage – Porto (Matosinhos) – Vila do Conde – 20 km
    Accommodation in a 3*Hotel – Accommodation and breakfast

    27 June – 2nd Stage – Vila do Conde – Esposende – 24,5 km
    Accommodation in a 3*Hotel – Accommodation and breakfast

    28 June – 3rd Stage – Esposende – Viana do Castelo – 23,5 km
    Accommodation in a 3*Hotel – Accommodation and breakfast

    29 June – 4th Stage – Viana do Castelo – Ancora – 19 km
    Accommodation in a 4*Hotel – Accommodation and breakfast

    30 July – 5th Stage – Ancora – A Guarda – 14 km
    Accommodation in a 2*Hotel – Accommodation and breakfast

    1 July – 6th Stage – A Guarda – Oia – 14 km
    Accommodation in a 2*Hotel – Accommodation and breakfast

    2 July – 7th Stage – Oia – Baiona – 17 km
    Accommodation in a 3*Hotel – Accommodation and breakfast

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Jeff! Your itinerary looks fine to me, the stages are not too long, your accommodation will be booked no need to worry about availability plus you are going to stay in hotels which means it’ll be more comfortable than staying in abergues. I assume you don’t walk all the way to Santiago.
      Buen Camino!

  25. Hi, Thanks for this great blog. I started thinking about walking the Portuguese Coastal route just recently. The idea of carrying all my things used to stop me before, but it seems to be possible to arrange luggage transport now.
    Do you have information about luggage transfers? Do you have to arrange that before you start or can you arrange it on the way? Can you arrange this at every albergue? And at other accommodation along the route? Is it possible to use it every day on this route? Or is there a risk you have to carry your luggage yourself at some parts eventually?
    Regards, Karin

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Karin! Thank you for the comment! We’ve never used any luggage transfer service on the Camino but we did see many people using it. I’d suggest to contact a company beforehand and find out how exactly it works. It’s possible to arrange that you luggage is transferred every day from albergue to albergue the only thing is that public (municipal) albergues usually don’t allow luggage without a pilgrim because they don’t accept booking in advance, private albergues and hostels don’t have any problem with it (I’d suggest to find out it with a company). There are several luggage transfer services you can try Pilbeo they say on the site that the do transfer luggage on the Coastal route from Porto to Santiago. Depending on the length of the stage it costs between 5-7 Euro per backpack, they pick it up at one albergue and transfer to the next one so when you arrive your backpack is already there.
      Buen Camino!

  26. Hi
    I’ve just looked at some of your costings, and for June they seem to be significantly higher. For example you quote 14 Euros for one person at Parque de Campismo Orbitur Angieras – the cheapest I could book there was for £47 (June 20). I had expected prices to be higher in the Summer months, but not by this much. This has me a little concerned.

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Steve! We didn’t stay at Parque de Campismo Orbitur Angeiras there are several Orbitur campsites, we stayed at Parque de Campismo Orbitur Rio Alto. As it says in the post for online booking there are only more expensive accommodation options (with attached bathroom and kitchen), plus I believe they have special prices for pilgrims that you can’t get if book online. Public albergues always charge the same between 5-6 Euro pp., private albergues and hostels might be more expensive in high season but not crazy expensive between 12 and 15 Euro. We walked another Camino route in June and didn’t notice that accommodation prices were higher than in May on the Portuguese Camino.
      Buen Camino!

  27. Holly Hanes Compton

    Hello
    I will be hiking April 1-11, 2019. I am wondering which route you think would be best? Mainly conserned with weather and availability of housing. Also, do you think there will be many others this time of year?
    Thanks
    Holly

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Holly! It depends on the weather conditions; if it’s rainy or windy I’d suggest to stick to the Central Route if it’s nice and sunny follow the Coastal Route. I don’t think accommodation will be a problem, most albergues are opened in April and there won’t be many people walking the Camino yet. You always can start along the coast and if it’s too cold or windy there switch to the Central route e.g. at Vila do Conde or Caminha. I don’t think there will be many people walking but there will be definitely some pilgrims you won’t be lonely.
      Buen Camino!

  28. Doreen Mc Kenna

    Hi
    Planning on doing my Camino end June from Porto and have found this blog very insightful and helpful. Thank You. My main concern as a woman walking alone is safety? My husband and son will join me in Vigo for the remainder… is the accommadations you mentioned child friendly ( my son is 12). We hope to stay on for a couple of days at the end to relax is there anywhere you could recommend ? Flying home from vigo. Thank you. Doreen

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Doreen! Thank you for your comment! I saw many women of different ages walking alone on the Portuguese Camino and nobody complained about safety or had any issues on the route besides in June there will be many people walking the Camino you always can join someone and walk together. Vigo is quite a touristy place I’m sure you’ll be able to find accommodation for your family, I think you can stay with your son at the hotel we stayed. Vigo is a nice city, the most famous thing here is Cies Islands where you can get by boat, it’s very close to the city, there are nice beaches and short hiking trails. There are several small cozy coastal towns nearby you can do a day trip by bus or join a tour. The Old Town (Casco Viejo) in a nice area to go out. The area around Vigo is famous as Riax Baixas wine region you can visit wine estates and do some tasting as well. If you have time you can do a day trip to Santiago de Compostela, about 1 hour by train, 1h30min. by bus. I think your total distance will be over 100km which means you can get your Compostela there.
      Buen Camino!

    • Hi Doreen,
      I walked from Porto to Santiago on the coastline in 2017 and there wasn’t a minute of my trip I felt unsafe. I actually felt safer than in my homeland, in Hungary. You also always have the opportunity to join other pilgrims on the way when you feel alone. Buen Camino!

  29. Hi
    We are a reasonably fit couple being 67/62 years old. we plan to do the coastal walk in June 2019. Some of the daily distances look daunting (eg 22km ++) even with luggage transfer. Also we prefer private accommodation like a hotel room with private bathroom.
    Any advice/thoughts/suggestions?

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Ian! You can walk a day as far as you want there are several private hotels and albergues on the way. You can download our PDF file (pop-up form that appears if you stay on the page for longer than 90 seconds. It contains distances between the towns as well as infrastructure in every town/village on the way. You can use it to plan your itinerary. On the stretch between A Ramallosa and Vigo there were not many options you’ll probably have to walk 21km all the way to Vigo otherwise I’m sure you’ll be able to find hotels at every 10-15km.
      Buen Camino!

      • I tried from different browsers – no any popup appeared. So I am withouf PDF 🙁 🙂

        • Stingy Nomads

          Hello, Vita! We currently disabled the pop-up form due to some technical issues. Please, check your e-mails, I sent it to you just now.
          Sorry for the inconvenience.
          Buen Camino!

          • Cheryl McCann

            Hello, could you please email me the PDF as well? I can’t seem to find it anywhere on your site.

  30. Charles Murphy

    I didn’t see much on the blog about cost. How much money should I plan on the trip costing me for breakfast and dinner, and hostels for 13 nights…incidentals. Will I be able to charge my cellphone so I can take pictures or should I plan for a camera with batteries? ANy trouble finding placed to get the passport stamped each day?

    • Stingy Nomads

      Dear, Charles! If you read the post carefully you’ll find right in the beginning (after the very first paragraph in bold) words “for more information on the cost, planning, packing etc. go to the complete Portuguese Camino guide. If you click on the link in that post you’ll find answers to all your questions. We’re very sorry for the confusion!
      Buen Camino!

  31. I am so glad I found your amazing blog, thank you so much. I will be doing a solo walk on Coastal way possibly from Baiona (or do you recommend another and my 1st long walk (ever). Can you share your thoughts about safety/is there anything I should watch out for enroute (I should have a roaming phone with me). I will stay in a hotel, not hostels. Is it difficult to arrange luggage transfer on my own?

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Denise! Thank you very much for the comment! We’re glad you liked our blog! As for the walk from Baiona, it felt safe, the main tip is don’t leave your valuables (phone, money etc.) unattended in a restaurant, bar, street etc. The route is well-marked, there will be other pilgrims on the way. The only “difficult” part was through Vigo, you go into the city, most hotels are quite far from the route, it took us about 1 hour to get from the historical center back to the route but we stopped on the way to take photos and to do sightseeing (the day we arrived we were too tired for that). In general the walk is not difficult just don’t start with walking long distances, take it easy in the beginning.
      In Spain it’s not difficult to arrange luggage transfer, I’d suggest to contact one of the companies beforehand to find out how it works, prices etc. on the Coastal Route (they definitely do the delivery on the Central Route from Tui) and if they pick up the luggage from any hotel or only specific places. We’ve never used it but from our understanding it’s pretty easy, you leave your backpack at your hotel/albergue with the name of the town and hotel you’re going to stay next, they pick it up and drive it to the next point. We saw many people using Correos, it’s a Spanish post office but they do a lot of luggage transfer on the Camino. There are several companies that arrange backpack delivery in case Correos don’t operate on the Coastal Route.
      Buen Camino!
      PS. If you enjoy the walk and have more time after completing the Portuguese Camino you can continue to Finisterre from Santiago, it’s another 3-4 days.

  32. Hello there

    My partner and I are planning on walking from a cousin’s home in Viana de Castelo for around 5-6 days at the end of January. We are hardened walkers so we appreciate the weather will be tough but can you comment on the ease of finding accommodation at this time of year?

    Thanks

    Victoria

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Victoria! Thank you for the question! Many municipal and private albergues on the stretch between Viana do Castelo and Santiago claim to be opened all year; Carreco (private), Caminha, A Guarda, Oia (private), Porto Mougas (private), Baiona (private albergue, hostel), A Ramallosa (private), there are no albergues in Vigo you have to stay in a hotel or hostel. From Redondela on (where the Coastal Route joins the Central Route) there will be more albergues that are opened in January. You’ll be able to find private rooms for good price in most towns on the way it’s off season and many hotels are opened.
      Buen Camino!

  33. Jurek from Poland.
    Rewelacyjny blog! Bardzo pomocny. Ruszam w październiku 2019. Dziękuję za inspiracje.
    English translation. A great blog! Very helpful. I’m starting in October 2019. Thank you for inspiration.

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Jerzy! Thank you for the comment! We added English translation to it because the majority of our audience is English. Unfortunately we don’t speak Polish so we used Google translate I hope it did a good job and translated your words correctly.
      Buen Camino!

  34. through all of my research to date, you have the best info about walking from porto. i will be leaving porto july 29 2019 and i expect alot of heat and sun along the coastal route. i am looking for a sizable map of the camino portuguese to place on my kitchen wall as i anticipate my journey. is there one you would recommend? i am grateful to you for sharing so much with future sojourners.

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Dona! Thank you very much for your comment! We’re glad you found our post helpful! You’re right it’ll be hot and sunny in July luckily on the Coastal Route you’ll get some fresh sea breeze that will make it more pleasant for walking.
      In our other post (Portuguese Camino complete guide) I used a road map of Spain and Portugal that I scanned and added a route in Photoshop because I couldn’t find a good and detailed map with a route. You can do the same, buy a map of Portugal, mark the route and put it on your fridge.
      Buen Camino!

  35. Wendy Hooker

    Hello Stingy Nomads
    Thank you for all this information on the Caminho. It is fantastic. I arrive in Lisbon 9 April 2019 and will walk the coastal path from Porto . Your post has been extremely helpful. I plan to stay in municipal albergues and I plan to take a small sleeping bag. Is this necessary??
    Thank you once again.
    Regards Wendy

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Wendy! Thank you for the comment! We’re glad you found our post useful! We’v walked 4 Camino routes and always had our light sleeping bags with. As I remember not all albergues on the Coastal Route had blankets, in April at night it will be still chilly, better to take a sleeping bag with.
      Buen Camino!

  36. Thank you for a wonderful, informative blog. Gets all the adventure juices flowing! Friends and I would really like to savour as much of the walk as possible by taking in many of the towns, villages, churches etc. As a result, might not get to walk more than 15km a day. Is this feasible? Are there many albergues in between the areas you have mentioned? Thanks once again and well done!

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Beryl! Thank you for the comment! We’re glad you’ve found our post helpful! Regarding your question, it’s a good idea to walk shorter days in order to have more time for sightseeing. There are albergues and hostels almost at every town on the way. At the end of this post there is a downloadable PDF file Coastal Route stages it has all the towns on the way with distances, albergues, ATMs, supermarkets etc. You can use it for planning your route.
      Buen Camino!

  37. Hi thank you for a wonderful blog. Some of the distances will probably be too far for me and I’m wondering if you could please tell me if there’s anywhere to stay in between. I’m not sure if I can walk much further than 20km a day. Thank you again for such a great blog.

    • Hello, Judy! Thank you for the comment! We’re glad you’ve found our post helpful. At the end of the post you can find a downloadable PDF file with the itinerary where you can find places (towns, villages) with albergues, restaurants, supermarkets etc. on the way.
      Buen Camino!

  38. Where can I purchase the above guide book? Amazon does not show this one.

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Gary! Amazon in what country doesn’t show this guide book? We had purchases of the book through Amazon from US and UK. If you can’t buy it online for some reasons you can check for it at a shop in the cathedral of Porto or Lisbon, depending where you start the Camino. We bought ours at Se Cathedral in Lisbon. Buen Camino!

  39. Thank you very much this information will be very useful when I go in May 2019. Very well written.
    Regards Judy

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Judy! Thank you very much for your comment! I’m sure you’ll enjoy the walk, May is a good time for the Camino Portugues!
      Buen Camino!

    • Hello Judy,
      I am also planning this trip in May 2019..it would be cool to meet you there.?

  40. Cindy Armati

    Hi,

    Have just been reading your blog. We are planning doing the Camino Portugues May 2018 and wish to do the spiritual route with the boat trip. Do you know if you are still eligible for the compostela if you do the boat trip?

    Kind regards

    Cindy

    • Stingy Nomads

      Hello, Cindy! Thank you for your comment! Taking a boat on the Spiritual Way is an official part of this route, you’ll definitely get your Compostela. In fact anybody who walked 100km+ can get Compostela in Santiago.
      Buen Camino!

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